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S chenker's ‘D ecline’: an I ntroduction

S chenker's ‘D ecline’: an I ntroduction INTRODUCTION For a long time, we were satisfied with an understanding of Schenker's concepts of musical structure and the methods by which he undertook detailed studies of the content of classical masterworks; in modern parlance, Schenker was `constructed' as a theorist and analyst. His outspoken observations on aesthetic, cultural and political matters were thought best left undisturbed, and in consequence went largely unexplored. To some extent, this state of affairs was only natural. The voice-leading graphs, by which Schenker's world had been charted for so long, are a relatively late feature of his oeuvre and, based on appearances alone, do not resemble the more text-based work from before 1920. His likes and dislikes, however, were formed at a relatively early stage in his development as a musician, before his theoretical programme began to take shape. Though these changed little after 1900 and continued to find expression in his later work, it was the originality of the graphic methods, not their consistency with earlier sentiments, that dominated the reception of Schenker until the 1980s. The past quarter-century, however, has seen a growth in interest not only in the earlier formulations of his theory but also in his relationship to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

S chenker's ‘D ecline’: an I ntroduction

Music Analysis , Volume 24 (1‐2) – Mar 1, 2005

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2249.2005.00216.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION For a long time, we were satisfied with an understanding of Schenker's concepts of musical structure and the methods by which he undertook detailed studies of the content of classical masterworks; in modern parlance, Schenker was `constructed' as a theorist and analyst. His outspoken observations on aesthetic, cultural and political matters were thought best left undisturbed, and in consequence went largely unexplored. To some extent, this state of affairs was only natural. The voice-leading graphs, by which Schenker's world had been charted for so long, are a relatively late feature of his oeuvre and, based on appearances alone, do not resemble the more text-based work from before 1920. His likes and dislikes, however, were formed at a relatively early stage in his development as a musician, before his theoretical programme began to take shape. Though these changed little after 1900 and continued to find expression in his later work, it was the originality of the graphic methods, not their consistency with earlier sentiments, that dominated the reception of Schenker until the 1980s. The past quarter-century, however, has seen a growth in interest not only in the earlier formulations of his theory but also in his relationship to

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2005

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