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Robert W. Witkin, Adorno on Music

Robert W. Witkin, Adorno on Music ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK CRITICAL FORUM company with Derrida's. Adorno's place within musicological enquiry appears assured for the time being, at least since he is the only critical figure seemingly rigorous enough to be thought capable of deflecting the subtle seductions and complications of postmodernism. Or, if you prefer, the only writer from whose `texts' one could hope to effect a proper transition to a postmodern, albeit not necessarily deconstructive, musicology. Conversely speaking, however, it is hard to say where the disciplinary reconstructions of new musicological thinking might in turn leave Adorno. For, on the one hand, he is too Eurocentric, too canonically biased and too caught up in suspect philosophies to be tolerated for long. Yet, on the other, his keen critical and social awareness might be just what is required. If there is any truth in the allegation spelled out by Edward Said ± that Anglo-American musicology and analysis has hitherto neglected any consideration of `ideology, . . . social space, or power' (quoted in Witkin, p. 4) ± then it is still by no means certain that Adorno should be seen as the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Robert W. Witkin, Adorno on Music

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (3) – Oct 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00127
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2000. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK CRITICAL FORUM company with Derrida's. Adorno's place within musicological enquiry appears assured for the time being, at least since he is the only critical figure seemingly rigorous enough to be thought capable of deflecting the subtle seductions and complications of postmodernism. Or, if you prefer, the only writer from whose `texts' one could hope to effect a proper transition to a postmodern, albeit not necessarily deconstructive, musicology. Conversely speaking, however, it is hard to say where the disciplinary reconstructions of new musicological thinking might in turn leave Adorno. For, on the one hand, he is too Eurocentric, too canonically biased and too caught up in suspect philosophies to be tolerated for long. Yet, on the other, his keen critical and social awareness might be just what is required. If there is any truth in the allegation spelled out by Edward Said ± that Anglo-American musicology and analysis has hitherto neglected any consideration of `ideology, . . . social space, or power' (quoted in Witkin, p. 4) ± then it is still by no means certain that Adorno should be seen as the

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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