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Rethinking Unity

Rethinking Unity The problem is not whether one defends or defies the notion of unity but whether anybody knows what unity is . . . [T]here needs to be a critique of unity, or at least some kind of definition that acknowledges that there is no unity to the notion of unity. (Chua 1999, p. 291) So I agree wholeheartedly with Morgan that the idea of unity should be revisited and revived in the light of its critique in the hands of analysts such as Kofi Agawu, Jonathan Kramer, Kevin Korsyn, Joseph Dubiel and myself. In fact, I am grateful that he has raised the issue, providing us with a brief but eloquent history of what he calls `anti-unitarian' analysis in the process. Unfortunately, my agreement with Morgan only goes this far. He finds my analysis of Beethoven's Op. 132 particularly objectionable and ultimately `flawed' (p. 42). In this respect I feel that I have succeeded and failed; succeeded in that my work has provoked a reaction as it was designed to do, but failed because the reaction was merely reactionary. Instead of pushing the discussion forward I seem to have caused Morgan to retreat back into the structuralist trench. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Rethinking Unity

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (2‐3) – Jul 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00209.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The problem is not whether one defends or defies the notion of unity but whether anybody knows what unity is . . . [T]here needs to be a critique of unity, or at least some kind of definition that acknowledges that there is no unity to the notion of unity. (Chua 1999, p. 291) So I agree wholeheartedly with Morgan that the idea of unity should be revisited and revived in the light of its critique in the hands of analysts such as Kofi Agawu, Jonathan Kramer, Kevin Korsyn, Joseph Dubiel and myself. In fact, I am grateful that he has raised the issue, providing us with a brief but eloquent history of what he calls `anti-unitarian' analysis in the process. Unfortunately, my agreement with Morgan only goes this far. He finds my analysis of Beethoven's Op. 132 particularly objectionable and ultimately `flawed' (p. 42). In this respect I feel that I have succeeded and failed; succeeded in that my work has provoked a reaction as it was designed to do, but failed because the reaction was merely reactionary. Instead of pushing the discussion forward I seem to have caused Morgan to retreat back into the structuralist trench.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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