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Rehabilitation in children and adolescents undergoing stem cell transplantation: A pilot study focused on motor performance

Rehabilitation in children and adolescents undergoing stem cell transplantation: A pilot study... INTRODUCTIONHematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative option for many diseases, such as hematologic malignancies and refractory solid tumours among children and adolescents (Miano et al., 2007). Its use in the paediatric population has increased over the last three decades as have its survival rates (Barriga et al., 2012). Despite this, HSCT causes a significant number of clinical complications and side effects, both in the short term (e.g., mucositis, fever, nausea and vomiting) and in the long term (e.g., organ toxicities and fatigue) (Kabak et al., 2019). Indeed, allogeneic HSCT recipients can develop graft‐versus‐host disease that can lead to extensive multi‐organ failure, system toxicities and mortality (Blazar et al., 2012). Due to the previous treatments, the severity of the conditioning regimen, length of isolation and hospitalisation, physical, cognitive and psychosocial functions can all be severely impaired (Chamorro‐Viña et al., 2010; Oeffinger et al., 2009), with a consequent reduction in autonomy and quality of life (QoL) (Hacker et al., 2006).Recent studies showed exercise and rehabilitation as a promising tool to decrease the side effects of HSCT and improve QoL in paediatric population undergoing HSCT (Lago et al., 2020; Martha et al., 2021). A systematic meta‐analysis review (Lago et al., 2020) reported that physical exercise is safe, feasible and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Rehabilitation in children and adolescents undergoing stem cell transplantation: A pilot study focused on motor performance

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13711
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONHematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative option for many diseases, such as hematologic malignancies and refractory solid tumours among children and adolescents (Miano et al., 2007). Its use in the paediatric population has increased over the last three decades as have its survival rates (Barriga et al., 2012). Despite this, HSCT causes a significant number of clinical complications and side effects, both in the short term (e.g., mucositis, fever, nausea and vomiting) and in the long term (e.g., organ toxicities and fatigue) (Kabak et al., 2019). Indeed, allogeneic HSCT recipients can develop graft‐versus‐host disease that can lead to extensive multi‐organ failure, system toxicities and mortality (Blazar et al., 2012). Due to the previous treatments, the severity of the conditioning regimen, length of isolation and hospitalisation, physical, cognitive and psychosocial functions can all be severely impaired (Chamorro‐Viña et al., 2010; Oeffinger et al., 2009), with a consequent reduction in autonomy and quality of life (QoL) (Hacker et al., 2006).Recent studies showed exercise and rehabilitation as a promising tool to decrease the side effects of HSCT and improve QoL in paediatric population undergoing HSCT (Lago et al., 2020; Martha et al., 2021). A systematic meta‐analysis review (Lago et al., 2020) reported that physical exercise is safe, feasible and

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: adolescents; children; fatigue; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; motor performance; physical therapy

References