Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Red wine astringency: a review

Red wine astringency: a review The chemical and physical basis for red wine astringency is reviewed. Models describing the physiological foundation of astringency are presented and compared. The phenolic and other red wine components that evoke astringency are described, together with their sensory properties and the factors that affect their perception. The paper also presents a detailed account of the chemical properties of saliva and the possible modes of interaction between these and red wine phenolics that lead to the necessary physical changes in saliva required to elicit astringency. Reasons for differences in astringency perception across oral sites and amongst individual tasters are also discussed. It is concluded that whilst great advances have been made in the field of red wine phenolic chemistry in recent years, a better understanding of the effect of wine polyphenol‐salivary protein interaction on the rheological properties of saliva is required in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of red wine astringency. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/red-wine-astringency-a-review-IWjVS9P4SA
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1322-7130
eISSN
1755-0238
DOI
10.1111/j.1755-0238.1998.tb00137.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The chemical and physical basis for red wine astringency is reviewed. Models describing the physiological foundation of astringency are presented and compared. The phenolic and other red wine components that evoke astringency are described, together with their sensory properties and the factors that affect their perception. The paper also presents a detailed account of the chemical properties of saliva and the possible modes of interaction between these and red wine phenolics that lead to the necessary physical changes in saliva required to elicit astringency. Reasons for differences in astringency perception across oral sites and amongst individual tasters are also discussed. It is concluded that whilst great advances have been made in the field of red wine phenolic chemistry in recent years, a better understanding of the effect of wine polyphenol‐salivary protein interaction on the rheological properties of saliva is required in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of red wine astringency.

Journal

Australian Journal of Grape and Wine ResearchWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1998

References