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Predictors of adherence, contamination and dropout in home‐based walking by lung and oesophageal cancer patients from two randomised control trials: An exploratory study

Predictors of adherence, contamination and dropout in home‐based walking by lung and oesophageal... INTRODUCTIONExercise is recommended for patients with cancer by several leading health organisations (Campbell et al., 2019; Patel et al., 2019). However, certain types of cancer have symptoms that functionally limit exercise during and after cancer treatments. For example, patients with lung or oesophageal cancer may have shortness of breath or fatigue, affecting their exercise endurance (Avancini, Sartori, et al., 2020; Gannon et al., 2017). In addition, factors such as adherence, contamination and dropout can influence the outcomes of exercise intervention studies and may even distort research findings. A meta‐analysis of 34 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) indicated that most studies in this area lack information about exercise adherence and contamination bias (Buffart et al., 2017). Therefore, understanding adherence, contamination and dropout rates, and the factors that influence them, is important when conducting exercise intervention research.During the COVID‐19 pandemic, visiting periods, numbers of visitors and social‐distancing protocols in hospitals were highly regulated, as per World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines (World Health Organization, 2020). In line with such policies, cancer patients accepted and preferred home‐based exercise intervention programmes during the COVID‐19 outbreak.Few studies in the field of exercise interventions have analysed the factors that influence exercise adherence, contamination bias and dropout rates among patients with lung or oesophageal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Predictors of adherence, contamination and dropout in home‐based walking by lung and oesophageal cancer patients from two randomised control trials: An exploratory study

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13635
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONExercise is recommended for patients with cancer by several leading health organisations (Campbell et al., 2019; Patel et al., 2019). However, certain types of cancer have symptoms that functionally limit exercise during and after cancer treatments. For example, patients with lung or oesophageal cancer may have shortness of breath or fatigue, affecting their exercise endurance (Avancini, Sartori, et al., 2020; Gannon et al., 2017). In addition, factors such as adherence, contamination and dropout can influence the outcomes of exercise intervention studies and may even distort research findings. A meta‐analysis of 34 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) indicated that most studies in this area lack information about exercise adherence and contamination bias (Buffart et al., 2017). Therefore, understanding adherence, contamination and dropout rates, and the factors that influence them, is important when conducting exercise intervention research.During the COVID‐19 pandemic, visiting periods, numbers of visitors and social‐distancing protocols in hospitals were highly regulated, as per World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines (World Health Organization, 2020). In line with such policies, cancer patients accepted and preferred home‐based exercise intervention programmes during the COVID‐19 outbreak.Few studies in the field of exercise interventions have analysed the factors that influence exercise adherence, contamination bias and dropout rates among patients with lung or oesophageal

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2022

Keywords: exercise; lung cancer; oesophageal cancer; patient dropout; physical activity; treatment adherence

References