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Pea Growth, Yield, and Quality in Different Crop Rotations and Cultural Practices

Pea Growth, Yield, and Quality in Different Crop Rotations and Cultural Practices AbbreviationsDCDPdurum–canola–durum–peaDDCPdurum–durum–canola–peaDDFPdurum–durum–flax–peaDFDPdurum–flax–durum–peaPea (Pisum sativum L.) requires little water to grow, and therefore, provides an important pulse crop in dryland cropping systems (Tanaka et al., 2010; Miller et al., 2015; Lenssen et al., 2018). Pea supplies protein and fiber for human and livestock diets (Hood‐Niefer et al., 2012), particularly for vegetarian people in developing countries with limited protein sources (Tzitzikas et al., 2006; Hood‐Niefer et al., 2012) and acts as a starch source widely used in processing noodles (Ratnayake et al., 2002; Tan et al., 2009). From a soil fertility perspective, pea fixes more N from the atmosphere than lentil (Lens culinaris L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculta L.) (Miller et al., 2003b) and needs little P or K fertilizer to grow than other legumes (Tzitzikas et al., 2006; Tao et al., 2017).In the semiarid region of the northern Great Plains, USA, traditional cropping systems that include conventional tillage with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–fallow have not only degraded soil quality by increasing soil erosion and reducing organic matter, but also decreased annualized yield (Lenssen et al., 2007; Sainju et al., 2013b). To replace fallow and enhance cropping intensification, pea has been increasingly grown in these regions in rotation with cereals (Miller http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Pea Growth, Yield, and Quality in Different Crop Rotations and Cultural Practices

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.10.0041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsDCDPdurum–canola–durum–peaDDCPdurum–durum–canola–peaDDFPdurum–durum–flax–peaDFDPdurum–flax–durum–peaPea (Pisum sativum L.) requires little water to grow, and therefore, provides an important pulse crop in dryland cropping systems (Tanaka et al., 2010; Miller et al., 2015; Lenssen et al., 2018). Pea supplies protein and fiber for human and livestock diets (Hood‐Niefer et al., 2012), particularly for vegetarian people in developing countries with limited protein sources (Tzitzikas et al., 2006; Hood‐Niefer et al., 2012) and acts as a starch source widely used in processing noodles (Ratnayake et al., 2002; Tan et al., 2009). From a soil fertility perspective, pea fixes more N from the atmosphere than lentil (Lens culinaris L.) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculta L.) (Miller et al., 2003b) and needs little P or K fertilizer to grow than other legumes (Tzitzikas et al., 2006; Tao et al., 2017).In the semiarid region of the northern Great Plains, USA, traditional cropping systems that include conventional tillage with spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–fallow have not only degraded soil quality by increasing soil erosion and reducing organic matter, but also decreased annualized yield (Lenssen et al., 2007; Sainju et al., 2013b). To replace fallow and enhance cropping intensification, pea has been increasingly grown in these regions in rotation with cereals (Miller

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References