Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Organicism, Form and Structural Decay: Nielsen’s Second Violin Sonata

Organicism, Form and Structural Decay: Nielsen’s Second Violin Sonata My sonata is the best piece of music that has so far been played at the festival, which I can say without self-satisfaction, but because it is the case, I sat entirely soberly and critically and arrived at that result. You wouldn't believe how the leading [musicians] from every country make a fuss of me and crowd around with requests for permission to be the first to perform my next work. ± It is strange that, something which one dreamt of as a young man: fame and understanding, come when one receives it rather with indifference.1 The critical success of the Sonata in Amsterdam stood in sharp contrast to its early reception. After the work's premiere on 7 April 1913, the newspaper Berlingske Tidende complained of `too much musical philosophising all the way through', while the critic for Nationaltidende claimed that, `if C.N. had not been named as the composer, one would have been inclined to write it off as drivel'.2 Despite the high-profile performance in Amsterdam, the Sonata has subsequently remained one of Nielsen's most intriguing and problematic works. Even among specialist discussions of Nielsen's music, it has attracted relatively little critical attention,3 and the work has http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Organicism, Form and Structural Decay: Nielsen’s Second Violin Sonata

Music Analysis , Volume 21 (2) – Jul 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/organicism-form-and-structural-decay-nielsen-s-second-violin-sonata-0d0Tmwt2DZ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00156
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

My sonata is the best piece of music that has so far been played at the festival, which I can say without self-satisfaction, but because it is the case, I sat entirely soberly and critically and arrived at that result. You wouldn't believe how the leading [musicians] from every country make a fuss of me and crowd around with requests for permission to be the first to perform my next work. ± It is strange that, something which one dreamt of as a young man: fame and understanding, come when one receives it rather with indifference.1 The critical success of the Sonata in Amsterdam stood in sharp contrast to its early reception. After the work's premiere on 7 April 1913, the newspaper Berlingske Tidende complained of `too much musical philosophising all the way through', while the critic for Nationaltidende claimed that, `if C.N. had not been named as the composer, one would have been inclined to write it off as drivel'.2 Despite the high-profile performance in Amsterdam, the Sonata has subsequently remained one of Nielsen's most intriguing and problematic works. Even among specialist discussions of Nielsen's music, it has attracted relatively little critical attention,3 and the work has

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.