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One of ‘Ray’s Babies’: Hula, history and Hawaiian rooms . Imada , Adria L. ( 2012 ) Aloha America: Hula Circuits Through the U.S. Empire. Durham and London : Duke University Press , 392 pp., $24.95, pbk, ISBN: 978‐0‐8223‐5207‐5 .

One of ‘Ray’s Babies’: Hula, history and Hawaiian rooms . Imada , Adria L. ( 2012 ) Aloha... In 1940, Ray Kinney, the Hawaiian‐Irish tenor and former orchestra leader of the Hotel Lexington's Hawaiian Room in New York City, assembled a group of young dancers on the island of Maui. Known collectively as ‘Ray's Babies’, they were to perform with the seasoned musician and showman both at home in Hawai‘i and in the continental United States. Yet, with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and World War II, their plans changed and they remained in the islands. The story of ‘Ray's Babies’ indicates what Adria Imada examines in Aloha America: Hula Circuits Through the U.S. Empire. Woven into the story of this group are the main topics of her book: hula troupes performing in and away from the islands; the complex relationships across hula, tourism, and the military; and the tensions attendant in a community grappling with colonial pressures, including cultural and social oppression. At the core is what Imada calls an ‘imagined intimacy’ or the fantasy of a hospitable and peaceful relationship between America and Hawai‘i. Over a century ago, when hula troupes first began performing overseas, the image of the graceful and always‐welcoming female hula dancer not only became one of the most exploited commodities, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asia Pacific Viewpoint Wiley

One of ‘Ray’s Babies’: Hula, history and Hawaiian rooms . Imada , Adria L. ( 2012 ) Aloha America: Hula Circuits Through the U.S. Empire. Durham and London : Duke University Press , 392 pp., $24.95, pbk, ISBN: 978‐0‐8223‐5207‐5 .

Asia Pacific Viewpoint , Volume 55 (3) – Dec 1, 2014

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Victoria University of Wellington and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd
ISSN
1360-7456
eISSN
1467-8373
DOI
10.1111/apv.12075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 1940, Ray Kinney, the Hawaiian‐Irish tenor and former orchestra leader of the Hotel Lexington's Hawaiian Room in New York City, assembled a group of young dancers on the island of Maui. Known collectively as ‘Ray's Babies’, they were to perform with the seasoned musician and showman both at home in Hawai‘i and in the continental United States. Yet, with the bombing of Pearl Harbor and World War II, their plans changed and they remained in the islands. The story of ‘Ray's Babies’ indicates what Adria Imada examines in Aloha America: Hula Circuits Through the U.S. Empire. Woven into the story of this group are the main topics of her book: hula troupes performing in and away from the islands; the complex relationships across hula, tourism, and the military; and the tensions attendant in a community grappling with colonial pressures, including cultural and social oppression. At the core is what Imada calls an ‘imagined intimacy’ or the fantasy of a hospitable and peaceful relationship between America and Hawai‘i. Over a century ago, when hula troupes first began performing overseas, the image of the graceful and always‐welcoming female hula dancer not only became one of the most exploited commodities,

Journal

Asia Pacific ViewpointWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2014

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