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Nutritional status and socio‐economic conditions as prognostic factors in the outcome of therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Nutritional status and socio‐economic conditions as prognostic factors in the outcome of therapy... The majority of children on earth are to be found in the developing world, many of them malnourished members of impoverished families. Thus, the effects of socio‐economic status (SES) on the therapeutic response of children with cancer are obviously relevant. The outcome of treatment in patients with the commonest form of cancer in childhood (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL) is clearly related to their SES. Studies conducted mainly in developing countries have shown malnutrition to be an important prognostic factor in such children. However, other socio‐economic conditions could affect the outcome of therapy in patients with ALL: access to communications, transportation, laboratory studies and therapy. Even in children with an “adequate” SES, malnutrition is still an adverse prognostic factor. Nutritional supplementation appears to be a valuable addition to chemotherapy in undernourished children with ALL. The choice of treatment for these children should accomodate the cultural, economic and nutritional status of the patients and their families. Protocols must be created for testing methods of nutritional intervention and their influence on pharmacology, drug tolerance and survival in ALL. The influences of poverty and illiteracy on compliance with treatment, especially oral medication, need to be evaluated. Such investigations are essential to improve results of treatment of socio‐economically disadvantaged children suffering from ALL and other forms of cancer. Int. J. Cancer Supplement 11:52–55, 1998 © 1998 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Cancer Wiley

Nutritional status and socio‐economic conditions as prognostic factors in the outcome of therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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References (18)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0020-7136
eISSN
1097-0215
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0215(1998)78:11+<52::AID-IJC15>3.0.CO;2-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The majority of children on earth are to be found in the developing world, many of them malnourished members of impoverished families. Thus, the effects of socio‐economic status (SES) on the therapeutic response of children with cancer are obviously relevant. The outcome of treatment in patients with the commonest form of cancer in childhood (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL) is clearly related to their SES. Studies conducted mainly in developing countries have shown malnutrition to be an important prognostic factor in such children. However, other socio‐economic conditions could affect the outcome of therapy in patients with ALL: access to communications, transportation, laboratory studies and therapy. Even in children with an “adequate” SES, malnutrition is still an adverse prognostic factor. Nutritional supplementation appears to be a valuable addition to chemotherapy in undernourished children with ALL. The choice of treatment for these children should accomodate the cultural, economic and nutritional status of the patients and their families. Protocols must be created for testing methods of nutritional intervention and their influence on pharmacology, drug tolerance and survival in ALL. The influences of poverty and illiteracy on compliance with treatment, especially oral medication, need to be evaluated. Such investigations are essential to improve results of treatment of socio‐economically disadvantaged children suffering from ALL and other forms of cancer. Int. J. Cancer Supplement 11:52–55, 1998 © 1998 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

International Journal of CancerWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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