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Nutrient Source and Tillage Effects on Maize: I. Micrometeorological Methods for Measuring Carbon Dioxide Emissions

Nutrient Source and Tillage Effects on Maize: I. Micrometeorological Methods for Measuring Carbon... AbbreviationsBREBBowen ratio energy balanceECeddy covarianceFPfarmer practiceGHGgreenhouse gasIRGAinfrared gas analyzerKturbulent diffusivityKHturbulent diffusivity for sensible heatLElatent energyMDSmarginal distribution samplingNEEnet ecosystem exchangeRigradient Richardson numberSMBspent microbial biomassu*friction velocityNet ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 is the net vertical CO2 flux between the soil–plant environment and the atmosphere (Chapin et al., 2006) and is a fundamental measure of C gain and loss from terrestrial systems to the atmosphere. Understanding NEE, and especially how it varies between ecosystems, is critical for understanding climate change on the global scale and how ecosystems emit or sequester C on a regional scale. Micrometeorological (hereafter referred to as “micromet”) methods, such as the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) and eddy covariance (EC) systems, can be used to measure NEE between the surface (soil and/or plant canopy) and the atmosphere.Eddy covariance is the most commonly used method for measuring NEE and surface fluxes. Prior to the development of inexpensive three dimensional (3D) sonic anemometers and fast‐response open‐path infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs), BREB systems were commonly used to estimate NEE, especially for grassland and agricultural ecosystems with short canopies (Angell et al., 2001). Some comparisons between EC and BREB methods yielded similar results (Dugas et al., 2001; Wolf et al., 2008), whereas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Nutrient Source and Tillage Effects on Maize: I. Micrometeorological Methods for Measuring Carbon Dioxide Emissions

10 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.02.0008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsBREBBowen ratio energy balanceECeddy covarianceFPfarmer practiceGHGgreenhouse gasIRGAinfrared gas analyzerKturbulent diffusivityKHturbulent diffusivity for sensible heatLElatent energyMDSmarginal distribution samplingNEEnet ecosystem exchangeRigradient Richardson numberSMBspent microbial biomassu*friction velocityNet ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 is the net vertical CO2 flux between the soil–plant environment and the atmosphere (Chapin et al., 2006) and is a fundamental measure of C gain and loss from terrestrial systems to the atmosphere. Understanding NEE, and especially how it varies between ecosystems, is critical for understanding climate change on the global scale and how ecosystems emit or sequester C on a regional scale. Micrometeorological (hereafter referred to as “micromet”) methods, such as the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) and eddy covariance (EC) systems, can be used to measure NEE between the surface (soil and/or plant canopy) and the atmosphere.Eddy covariance is the most commonly used method for measuring NEE and surface fluxes. Prior to the development of inexpensive three dimensional (3D) sonic anemometers and fast‐response open‐path infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs), BREB systems were commonly used to estimate NEE, especially for grassland and agricultural ecosystems with short canopies (Angell et al., 2001). Some comparisons between EC and BREB methods yielded similar results (Dugas et al., 2001; Wolf et al., 2008), whereas

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References