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Nonconformist Notions of Nineteenth–Century Enharmonicism

Nonconformist Notions of Nineteenth–Century Enharmonicism Music Analysis, 21/ii (2002) 115 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK DANIEL HARRISON place where claims can be made for an eternal and formal quality to the pitch/ pitch-class/key in question. Extravagant as these claims might seem in the abstract, they take suggestive forms in analytical practice: in what ways might the E‘ of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben, for example, be the `same' as the E‘ of Beethoven's `Eroica'? Like geographical poles, the farthest reaches of the places described in the previous paragraphs are inhospitable to human beings. Scholars of music, however, have settled much closer to the second than to the first, for generalisations about pitch(-class) and key are fundamental to their discourse. In this article, I explore territory closer to the first pole in the hope of developing analytical techniques intended for late nineteenth-century music. Because the fundamental issue at hand concerns the margins of `sameness' and `difference', the article engages with that feature of late nineteenth-century music ± enharmonicism ± where this issue is played out as a matter of compositional technique. As a result of this engagement, and consistent with the geographical image worked in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Nonconformist Notions of Nineteenth–Century Enharmonicism

Music Analysis , Volume 21 (2) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music Analysis, 21/ii (2002) 115 ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK DANIEL HARRISON place where claims can be made for an eternal and formal quality to the pitch/ pitch-class/key in question. Extravagant as these claims might seem in the abstract, they take suggestive forms in analytical practice: in what ways might the E‘ of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben, for example, be the `same' as the E‘ of Beethoven's `Eroica'? Like geographical poles, the farthest reaches of the places described in the previous paragraphs are inhospitable to human beings. Scholars of music, however, have settled much closer to the second than to the first, for generalisations about pitch(-class) and key are fundamental to their discourse. In this article, I explore territory closer to the first pole in the hope of developing analytical techniques intended for late nineteenth-century music. Because the fundamental issue at hand concerns the margins of `sameness' and `difference', the article engages with that feature of late nineteenth-century music ± enharmonicism ± where this issue is played out as a matter of compositional technique. As a result of this engagement, and consistent with the geographical image worked in

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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