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Nitrate Leaching and Potato Yield under Varying Plow Timing and Nitrogen Rate

Nitrate Leaching and Potato Yield under Varying Plow Timing and Nitrogen Rate AbbreviationsAAFCAgriculture and Agri‐Food CanadaANRapparent nitrogen recoveryBMPbeneficial management practiceECCCEnvironment and Climate Change CanadaRBRusset BurbankSOMsoil organic matterPotato (Solanum tuberosum L.), constituting the fourth most important food staple crop after rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) worldwide, plays a significant role in global food and nutrition security (DeFauw et al., 2012). World potato production is projected to increase by about 30% from 2015 to 2050 as global population and food demands grow (Porter and Faulkner, 2015). Potato producers commonly apply high fertilizer N input rates to potato crops to meet industry tuber yield and quality requirements (Zebarth and Rosen, 2007). Potato plants have a shallow root system with 85% of root length within the upper 0.3‐m soil layer (Opena and Porter, 1999), and their apparent N recovery (ANR = whole plant N accumulation – soil N ÷ fertilizer N input) can be as low as 40 to 60% (Zebarth and Rosen, 2007; Vos, 2009). As a result, potato production systems are prone to high nitrate leaching, which has commonly been linked to groundwater nitrate hotspots (Peralta and Stockle, 2001; Wilson et al., 2010; Shrestha et al., 2010; Bero et al., 2014; Zebarth et al., 2015). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Nitrate Leaching and Potato Yield under Varying Plow Timing and Nitrogen Rate

14 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.05.0032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsAAFCAgriculture and Agri‐Food CanadaANRapparent nitrogen recoveryBMPbeneficial management practiceECCCEnvironment and Climate Change CanadaRBRusset BurbankSOMsoil organic matterPotato (Solanum tuberosum L.), constituting the fourth most important food staple crop after rice (Oryza sativa L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and maize (Zea mays L.) worldwide, plays a significant role in global food and nutrition security (DeFauw et al., 2012). World potato production is projected to increase by about 30% from 2015 to 2050 as global population and food demands grow (Porter and Faulkner, 2015). Potato producers commonly apply high fertilizer N input rates to potato crops to meet industry tuber yield and quality requirements (Zebarth and Rosen, 2007). Potato plants have a shallow root system with 85% of root length within the upper 0.3‐m soil layer (Opena and Porter, 1999), and their apparent N recovery (ANR = whole plant N accumulation – soil N ÷ fertilizer N input) can be as low as 40 to 60% (Zebarth and Rosen, 2007; Vos, 2009). As a result, potato production systems are prone to high nitrate leaching, which has commonly been linked to groundwater nitrate hotspots (Peralta and Stockle, 2001; Wilson et al., 2010; Shrestha et al., 2010; Bero et al., 2014; Zebarth et al., 2015).

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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