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New Editor's Note

New Editor's Note Alan Street's valedictory ‘Editor's Note’, published in the last issue of this journal, prompts me to introduce myself as the new Editor of Music Analysis . In truth, however, we have undergone what might be more accurately described as a ‘Cabinet reshuffle’ than a change of leadership: Alan continues to take an active role for us as Associate Editor, while Michael Spitzer succeeds me as Chair of the Editorial Board. It is a pleasure to continue working with Alan and Michael, and I also offer a warm welcome to Edward Venn as the new Critical Forum Editor, a post held many years by the indefatigable Julian Horton. Regular readers – and librarians – may have noted that journal production has moved into a higher gear with the recent publication of papers from the 2009 Durham conference on Music and Emotion as a triple‐issue, Volume 29 (autumn 2011), and the articles and reviews for Volume 30, No. 1 and Nos. 2–3 (spring and summer 2012, respectively). For the foreseeable future, we aim to publish the journal in single issues, in the hope that its regular appearance at intervals of three to four months will encourage readers to make the Correspondence page a regular feature. ‘Critical plurality’, as Alan expresses it, will remain at the heart of the journal's philosophy, and we continue to welcome contributions across a broad spectrum of topics, including popular, early and non‐Western music, and those whose focus is cognitive, semiotic, or (self‐)critical. As a scholar formally trained in historical musicology, who played the Schenker card to gain membership in the theory and analysis confraternity, I am aware of the affinity between these previously unseparated disciplines, and I warmly invite those who work on the sources of theory and analysis – in archives as far afield as Basel, Switzerland, and Riverside, California – to consider Music Analysis as an appropriate forum for their research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

New Editor's Note

Music Analysis , Volume 31 (1) – Mar 1, 2012

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12000
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Alan Street's valedictory ‘Editor's Note’, published in the last issue of this journal, prompts me to introduce myself as the new Editor of Music Analysis . In truth, however, we have undergone what might be more accurately described as a ‘Cabinet reshuffle’ than a change of leadership: Alan continues to take an active role for us as Associate Editor, while Michael Spitzer succeeds me as Chair of the Editorial Board. It is a pleasure to continue working with Alan and Michael, and I also offer a warm welcome to Edward Venn as the new Critical Forum Editor, a post held many years by the indefatigable Julian Horton. Regular readers – and librarians – may have noted that journal production has moved into a higher gear with the recent publication of papers from the 2009 Durham conference on Music and Emotion as a triple‐issue, Volume 29 (autumn 2011), and the articles and reviews for Volume 30, No. 1 and Nos. 2–3 (spring and summer 2012, respectively). For the foreseeable future, we aim to publish the journal in single issues, in the hope that its regular appearance at intervals of three to four months will encourage readers to make the Correspondence page a regular feature. ‘Critical plurality’, as Alan expresses it, will remain at the heart of the journal's philosophy, and we continue to welcome contributions across a broad spectrum of topics, including popular, early and non‐Western music, and those whose focus is cognitive, semiotic, or (self‐)critical. As a scholar formally trained in historical musicology, who played the Schenker card to gain membership in the theory and analysis confraternity, I am aware of the affinity between these previously unseparated disciplines, and I warmly invite those who work on the sources of theory and analysis – in archives as far afield as Basel, Switzerland, and Riverside, California – to consider Music Analysis as an appropriate forum for their research.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2012

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