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Musical Articulation

Musical Articulation * A version of this article was given as the keynote lecture at OXMAC 2000, the Oxford University Music Analysis Conference, September 2000. Music Analysis, 21/ii (2002) ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK Á NICOLAS MEEUS unknown, it is because one does so on the basis of words known; and if words can be agreed upon by a community, then this is at least partly due to their being in limited number and made up of a still further limited number of different sonorities. One of my claims is that music shares this characteristic with language and that, if music can be analysed, then it is not only because it is articulated, but also because this articulation is economical ± that is, because the units of the lower level are relatively less numerous than those of the higher level. This is but another way of stressing the importance of repetition in music: the same units can be found at various moments in a musical work and they can even repeat from work to work. More complex cases involve transformations of the units, but such transformations also participate in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Musical Articulation

Music Analysis , Volume 21 (2) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00155
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

* A version of this article was given as the keynote lecture at OXMAC 2000, the Oxford University Music Analysis Conference, September 2000. Music Analysis, 21/ii (2002) ß Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 2002. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK Á NICOLAS MEEUS unknown, it is because one does so on the basis of words known; and if words can be agreed upon by a community, then this is at least partly due to their being in limited number and made up of a still further limited number of different sonorities. One of my claims is that music shares this characteristic with language and that, if music can be analysed, then it is not only because it is articulated, but also because this articulation is economical ± that is, because the units of the lower level are relatively less numerous than those of the higher level. This is but another way of stressing the importance of repetition in music: the same units can be found at various moments in a musical work and they can even repeat from work to work. More complex cases involve transformations of the units, but such transformations also participate in

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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