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Manure and Management Affect Grassland Production and Soil Quality in Organic Lamb Production

Manure and Management Affect Grassland Production and Soil Quality in Organic Lamb Production AbbreviationsWVUWest Virginia UniversityWorldwide, many hectares of grassland are located in hill land areas. Although these areas are diverse in topography, climate, soil, and vegetation, they share common problems and opportunities (Hopkins, 2011). Production costs on hill land farms are higher compared with those on more level land. Most hill land is at a higher altitude than more level land, with the result that growing seasons are shorter and annual forage production is lower. Maintaining economically viable hill land farms contributes to the touristic appeal of these areas, and well‐managed grassland farms provide valuable ecosystem services. Abandonment and socio‐economic changes are major challenges to sustainable grassland farming on hill land. Sustainable hill land farming continues to rely on the use of low external inputs, judicious and intensive management of grassland, and added value to products, primarily from ruminants (Hopkins, 2011; Milton and Davies, 1947; Vipond and Frater, 2017).Maintenance of soil‐available plant nutrients is an important aspect of livestock production from grassland. For sustainable food production, Lal and Pierce (1991) advocate the optimization of inputs rather than the achievement of short‐term yield increases. Grazing animals modify and accelerate the flow of nutrients by ingesting plant biomass and returning 70 to 95% http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Manure and Management Affect Grassland Production and Soil Quality in Organic Lamb Production

8 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.07.0058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsWVUWest Virginia UniversityWorldwide, many hectares of grassland are located in hill land areas. Although these areas are diverse in topography, climate, soil, and vegetation, they share common problems and opportunities (Hopkins, 2011). Production costs on hill land farms are higher compared with those on more level land. Most hill land is at a higher altitude than more level land, with the result that growing seasons are shorter and annual forage production is lower. Maintaining economically viable hill land farms contributes to the touristic appeal of these areas, and well‐managed grassland farms provide valuable ecosystem services. Abandonment and socio‐economic changes are major challenges to sustainable grassland farming on hill land. Sustainable hill land farming continues to rely on the use of low external inputs, judicious and intensive management of grassland, and added value to products, primarily from ruminants (Hopkins, 2011; Milton and Davies, 1947; Vipond and Frater, 2017).Maintenance of soil‐available plant nutrients is an important aspect of livestock production from grassland. For sustainable food production, Lal and Pierce (1991) advocate the optimization of inputs rather than the achievement of short‐term yield increases. Grazing animals modify and accelerate the flow of nutrients by ingesting plant biomass and returning 70 to 95%

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References