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Managing ‘Egan’ Wheat with a Gene for High Grain Protein

Managing ‘Egan’ Wheat with a Gene for High Grain Protein AbbreviationsETevapotranspirationHRSWhard red spring wheatMAPmonoammonium phosphateSOMsoil organic matterXox‐axis breakpointThe worldwide demand for high yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and other cereal crops leads to high rates of N application, which is an environmental concern (Mueller et al., 2014). Grain yield response at further increases of N application is small and generally plateaus (Cassman et al., 2003; Mueller et al., 2012). Increases in N application are usually done to achieve a premium grain protein (Corassa et al., 2018).For hard red spring wheat (HRSW), grain protein of greater than 140 g kg−1 command price premiums (Brown et al., 2005; US Wheat Associates, 2014) when global market demand for high protein is available. When high protein demand is available, a grain protein <140 g kg−1 can also lead to a discounted HRSW price. Thus, high grain protein for HRSW is preferred, which can be achieved by an application of more N, especially during an optimal growing condition for yield.The grain protein‐N response is influenced by both genetics and factors related to the environment and management such as moisture availability and growing conditions (Fowler, 2003). ‘Egan’ is an HRSW cultivar developed mainly for resistance to wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana). Egan inherited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Managing ‘Egan’ Wheat with a Gene for High Grain Protein

8 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.03.0019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsETevapotranspirationHRSWhard red spring wheatMAPmonoammonium phosphateSOMsoil organic matterXox‐axis breakpointThe worldwide demand for high yield and quality in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and other cereal crops leads to high rates of N application, which is an environmental concern (Mueller et al., 2014). Grain yield response at further increases of N application is small and generally plateaus (Cassman et al., 2003; Mueller et al., 2012). Increases in N application are usually done to achieve a premium grain protein (Corassa et al., 2018).For hard red spring wheat (HRSW), grain protein of greater than 140 g kg−1 command price premiums (Brown et al., 2005; US Wheat Associates, 2014) when global market demand for high protein is available. When high protein demand is available, a grain protein <140 g kg−1 can also lead to a discounted HRSW price. Thus, high grain protein for HRSW is preferred, which can be achieved by an application of more N, especially during an optimal growing condition for yield.The grain protein‐N response is influenced by both genetics and factors related to the environment and management such as moisture availability and growing conditions (Fowler, 2003). ‘Egan’ is an HRSW cultivar developed mainly for resistance to wheat midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana). Egan inherited

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References