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Malnutrition in children with cancer. Incidence and consequence

Malnutrition in children with cancer. Incidence and consequence Overt malnutrition in children with cancer is seen with surprising frequency: up to 37.5% in a group of patients with disease metastatic to or from bone, and 17.5% in a group of newly diagnosed patients with abdominal or pelvic tumors. It appears more frequent in some cancers. e.g., Ewing's sarcoma, than in others, e.g., osteosarcoma. Criteria for diagnosis of overt malnutrition are applicable to the child with cancer. Such overt malnutrition can be successfully and safely treated with intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH). Marginal malnutrition is a state that can be inferred from clinical behavior, although it cannot be objectively diagnosed as yet. Early data suggest that deterioration to overt malnutrition can be averted through IVH. Such nutritional intervention may increase chemotherapeutic tolerance and improve immune defenses. Since childhood cancer is beginning to frequently show excellent outcome, the association of malnutrition with progressive disease strongly suggests investigation of the role of nutritional support. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Wiley

Malnutrition in children with cancer. Incidence and consequence

Cancer , Volume 43 (S5) – May 1, 1979

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References (28)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0008-543X
eISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/1097-0142(197905)43:5+<2030::AID-CNCR2820430711>3.0.CO;2-S
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Overt malnutrition in children with cancer is seen with surprising frequency: up to 37.5% in a group of patients with disease metastatic to or from bone, and 17.5% in a group of newly diagnosed patients with abdominal or pelvic tumors. It appears more frequent in some cancers. e.g., Ewing's sarcoma, than in others, e.g., osteosarcoma. Criteria for diagnosis of overt malnutrition are applicable to the child with cancer. Such overt malnutrition can be successfully and safely treated with intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH). Marginal malnutrition is a state that can be inferred from clinical behavior, although it cannot be objectively diagnosed as yet. Early data suggest that deterioration to overt malnutrition can be averted through IVH. Such nutritional intervention may increase chemotherapeutic tolerance and improve immune defenses. Since childhood cancer is beginning to frequently show excellent outcome, the association of malnutrition with progressive disease strongly suggests investigation of the role of nutritional support.

Journal

CancerWiley

Published: May 1, 1979

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