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Location, production systems, and processing method effects on qualities of Kafa Biosphere Reserve coffees

Location, production systems, and processing method effects on qualities of Kafa Biosphere... A comprehensive physical and cup quality assessment of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) has not yet been conducted on Kafa Biosphere Reserve coffees. Hence, the influence of location, production systems, and processing methods on coffee bean physical and sensorial qualities were studied to identify the inherent qualities and suitable preparation methods for the improvement of bean physical and organoleptic qualities. In a three‐stage nested design, factors such as location (Gimbo, Gawata, and Decha districts), coffee production system (forest, semiforest, and garden), and processing method (wet, semiwet, and dry) were considered. Preliminary coffee quality assessment data were gathered from bean physical and cup quality analyses of coffee obtained from the combination of the three factors. An ANOVA was conducted on preliminary coffee quality data. The result of the ANOVA showed that location and production system effects were significant only on bean moisture content (P < .01) and acidity (P < .05), respectively. The processing effect had a significant effect on bean moisture (P < .01), odor (P < .001), raw (P < .01), and preliminary grade (P < .05). Better coffee quality was maintained in the dry coffee processing method within the recommended moisture content. Forest and semiforest coffees respond poorly in odor and overall raw coffee quality when treated with wet and semiwet processing methods. Hence, to attain a better quality of coffee, rather than proper harvesting procedures, more emphasis should be given to choosing proper processing methods. Further investigation that includes the effects of elevation gradient is recommended. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Location, production systems, and processing method effects on qualities of Kafa Biosphere Reserve coffees

10 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 Crop Science Society of America and American Society of Agronomy.
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.1002/agg2.20270
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A comprehensive physical and cup quality assessment of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) has not yet been conducted on Kafa Biosphere Reserve coffees. Hence, the influence of location, production systems, and processing methods on coffee bean physical and sensorial qualities were studied to identify the inherent qualities and suitable preparation methods for the improvement of bean physical and organoleptic qualities. In a three‐stage nested design, factors such as location (Gimbo, Gawata, and Decha districts), coffee production system (forest, semiforest, and garden), and processing method (wet, semiwet, and dry) were considered. Preliminary coffee quality assessment data were gathered from bean physical and cup quality analyses of coffee obtained from the combination of the three factors. An ANOVA was conducted on preliminary coffee quality data. The result of the ANOVA showed that location and production system effects were significant only on bean moisture content (P < .01) and acidity (P < .05), respectively. The processing effect had a significant effect on bean moisture (P < .01), odor (P < .001), raw (P < .01), and preliminary grade (P < .05). Better coffee quality was maintained in the dry coffee processing method within the recommended moisture content. Forest and semiforest coffees respond poorly in odor and overall raw coffee quality when treated with wet and semiwet processing methods. Hence, to attain a better quality of coffee, rather than proper harvesting procedures, more emphasis should be given to choosing proper processing methods. Further investigation that includes the effects of elevation gradient is recommended.

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2022

References