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Laurel Parsons and Brenda Ravenscroft (eds), Analytical Essays on Music by Women Composers: Secular & Sacred Music to 1900 (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2018). xi + 273 pp. £41.99 (hb). ISBN: 9780190237028.

Laurel Parsons and Brenda Ravenscroft (eds), Analytical Essays on Music by Women Composers:... Much has changed in the field of music analysis since Joseph Kerman's ‘How We Got Into Analysis, and How to Get Out’ rippled through the discipline (1980). If Kerman's impassioned call for a move away from formalism towards ‘criticism’ was met with some resistance,1 so it also provided grounds for rethinking the role of analysis in connecting musical material to the wider world.2 One recalls, among other scholarship, Susan McClary's influential accounts of the ways in which music not only represents but actively shapes ideas of gender and sexuality (see also Citron 1993 and 1990; Solie 1993; and Brett, Wood and Thomas 1994). McClary's (1991 and 1994) approach – whether in terms of hearing homosexuality in Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony, Op. 36, or detecting alternative constructions of masculinity in Franz Schubert's ‘Unfinished’ Symphony, D. 759 – has offered profound ways of transforming the question of ‘how to get out of analysis’ into how to engage analysis as a tool for situating music in histories of thought, feeling, sound and sensation. Turning to performance has further broadened the boundaries of what analysis can be and do, with hermeneutic, text‐based interpretations giving way to corporeal engagement with music, as seen http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Laurel Parsons and Brenda Ravenscroft (eds), Analytical Essays on Music by Women Composers: Secular & Sacred Music to 1900 (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2018). xi + 273 pp. £41.99 (hb). ISBN: 9780190237028.

Music Analysis , Volume 41 (2) – Jul 1, 2022

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12193
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Much has changed in the field of music analysis since Joseph Kerman's ‘How We Got Into Analysis, and How to Get Out’ rippled through the discipline (1980). If Kerman's impassioned call for a move away from formalism towards ‘criticism’ was met with some resistance,1 so it also provided grounds for rethinking the role of analysis in connecting musical material to the wider world.2 One recalls, among other scholarship, Susan McClary's influential accounts of the ways in which music not only represents but actively shapes ideas of gender and sexuality (see also Citron 1993 and 1990; Solie 1993; and Brett, Wood and Thomas 1994). McClary's (1991 and 1994) approach – whether in terms of hearing homosexuality in Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's Fourth Symphony, Op. 36, or detecting alternative constructions of masculinity in Franz Schubert's ‘Unfinished’ Symphony, D. 759 – has offered profound ways of transforming the question of ‘how to get out of analysis’ into how to engage analysis as a tool for situating music in histories of thought, feeling, sound and sensation. Turning to performance has further broadened the boundaries of what analysis can be and do, with hermeneutic, text‐based interpretations giving way to corporeal engagement with music, as seen

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2022

References