Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

J ankélévitch the O bscure ( d )

J ankélévitch the O bscure ( d ) I Vladimir Jankélévitch (1903–85) has recently been exhumed as the latest guru of contemporary musicology, primarily as a result of Carolyn Abbate's recent work drawing on his writings (2001 ), in particular his Maurice Ravel (1939; 1976). Abbate's translation of La musique et l’ineffable (1961) is, I assume, intended to dust him off and reveal him to the twenty‐first century as seer and progenitor of the dominant stream of musicology in recent decades. Richard Taruskin's laudatory back‐cover endorsement attempts to propel Jankélévitch to a nirvana beyond critique, so that even before we open the book Jankélévitch has survived the day of judgement and is already fully resurrected. The cover itself is beautiful (in Symbolist mode, all Marian blue and gold) and invites the reader to consider Jankélévitch in a state of grace. Abbate's introductory essay (‘Jankélévitch's Singularity’) is elegant, informative, and stimulating, and the presentation in general is superb: all this is quite heavenly. Yet forgive me if, after reading this book, I resist the power of advertising, packaging and academic cachet. Such attractions aside, Jankélévitch disappoints when he attempts to express the heavenliness of music to those with their feet on the ground. His thought is often http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

J ankélévitch the O bscure ( d )

Music Analysis , Volume 25 (3) – Oct 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/j-ank-l-vitch-the-o-bscure-d-E9mTbS000m
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2249.2006.00246.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I Vladimir Jankélévitch (1903–85) has recently been exhumed as the latest guru of contemporary musicology, primarily as a result of Carolyn Abbate's recent work drawing on his writings (2001 ), in particular his Maurice Ravel (1939; 1976). Abbate's translation of La musique et l’ineffable (1961) is, I assume, intended to dust him off and reveal him to the twenty‐first century as seer and progenitor of the dominant stream of musicology in recent decades. Richard Taruskin's laudatory back‐cover endorsement attempts to propel Jankélévitch to a nirvana beyond critique, so that even before we open the book Jankélévitch has survived the day of judgement and is already fully resurrected. The cover itself is beautiful (in Symbolist mode, all Marian blue and gold) and invites the reader to consider Jankélévitch in a state of grace. Abbate's introductory essay (‘Jankélévitch's Singularity’) is elegant, informative, and stimulating, and the presentation in general is superb: all this is quite heavenly. Yet forgive me if, after reading this book, I resist the power of advertising, packaging and academic cachet. Such attractions aside, Jankélévitch disappoints when he attempts to express the heavenliness of music to those with their feet on the ground. His thought is often

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2006

References