Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

‘It needs experience and courage’: Awareness towards end of life communication practices in oncologists: A mixed methods study

‘It needs experience and courage’: Awareness towards end of life communication practices in... INTRODUCTIONConveying bad news such as the poor prognosis of an oncological disease is generally regarded as one of the most challenging aspects of the medical profession (Vandekieft, 2001). However, physicians' recognition of the importance of these discussions is steadily growing (Quill, 2000).Several studies have focused on physicians' experiences and struggles with end of life communication (EOLC) (Friedrichsen & Milberg, 2006; Periyakoil et al., 2015; Rodenbach et al., 2015), and individual as well as cultural differences were consistently found (Koenig et al., 1992; Mystakidou et al., 1996; Thomsen et al., 1993). This struggle is often observed, resulting in vague, misleading and ambiguous communication styles where physicians attempt to find a balance between providing realistic information as well as not to destroy hope of their patients (Fallowfield et al., 2002). Importantly, such ambivalent efforts might collude in not discussing a palliative situation at all (Helft, 2005).The positive effect of the physicians' knowledge, awareness and self‐confidence on successful EOLC is well known (Bradley et al., 2002; Vandekieft, 2001). Physicians, who feel confident in EOLC, refer patients more often to hospice care (Bradley et al., 2002), whereas patients, who receive the information they want, are more satisfied and less emotionally burdened (Zachariae et al., 2003). Additionally, physicians state to better cope with the mortality of their patients http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

‘It needs experience and courage’: Awareness towards end of life communication practices in oncologists: A mixed methods study

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/it-needs-experience-and-courage-awareness-towards-end-of-life-28rUMAggws
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13737
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONConveying bad news such as the poor prognosis of an oncological disease is generally regarded as one of the most challenging aspects of the medical profession (Vandekieft, 2001). However, physicians' recognition of the importance of these discussions is steadily growing (Quill, 2000).Several studies have focused on physicians' experiences and struggles with end of life communication (EOLC) (Friedrichsen & Milberg, 2006; Periyakoil et al., 2015; Rodenbach et al., 2015), and individual as well as cultural differences were consistently found (Koenig et al., 1992; Mystakidou et al., 1996; Thomsen et al., 1993). This struggle is often observed, resulting in vague, misleading and ambiguous communication styles where physicians attempt to find a balance between providing realistic information as well as not to destroy hope of their patients (Fallowfield et al., 2002). Importantly, such ambivalent efforts might collude in not discussing a palliative situation at all (Helft, 2005).The positive effect of the physicians' knowledge, awareness and self‐confidence on successful EOLC is well known (Bradley et al., 2002; Vandekieft, 2001). Physicians, who feel confident in EOLC, refer patients more often to hospice care (Bradley et al., 2002), whereas patients, who receive the information they want, are more satisfied and less emotionally burdened (Zachariae et al., 2003). Additionally, physicians state to better cope with the mortality of their patients

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: attitude; cancer; end of life communication; oncology; physician patient communication

References