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Issues in Australian Foreign Policy

Issues in Australian Foreign Policy TOM CONLEY International Business and Asian Studies, Griffith University Introduction The issue of bipartisanship in Australian foreign policy is an enduring element of foreign policy analysis in Australia. Ungerer begins the previous review with the question: “Is Australian foreign policy still bipartisan?” Suggesting that the answer might now be no, he points out that: The Coalition Government under Prime Minister John Howard has emphasised above all the enduring centrality of Australia’s formal alliance relationship with the United States (US) and the guiding benefits of asymmetric bilateralism. Labor, under its new leader, Mark Latham, has drawn on the legacy of H.V. Evatt and Gareth Evans to rediscover the benefits of liberal internationalism and the continuing allure of regional engagement with Asia. Although these positions are neither revolutionary nor new, there was a real sense during the first half of 2004 that the dividing lines between the two parties on foreign policy issues were being drawn ever sharper.1 Any period with a federal election in the middle of it is bound to accentuate the differences between the two major parties in Australian politics. Foreign policy, as Ungerer also notes, was heavily politicised during 2004. But despite this politicisation, a wealth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Journal of Politics and History Wiley

Issues in Australian Foreign Policy

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0004-9522
eISSN
1467-8497
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-8497.2005.00373.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TOM CONLEY International Business and Asian Studies, Griffith University Introduction The issue of bipartisanship in Australian foreign policy is an enduring element of foreign policy analysis in Australia. Ungerer begins the previous review with the question: “Is Australian foreign policy still bipartisan?” Suggesting that the answer might now be no, he points out that: The Coalition Government under Prime Minister John Howard has emphasised above all the enduring centrality of Australia’s formal alliance relationship with the United States (US) and the guiding benefits of asymmetric bilateralism. Labor, under its new leader, Mark Latham, has drawn on the legacy of H.V. Evatt and Gareth Evans to rediscover the benefits of liberal internationalism and the continuing allure of regional engagement with Asia. Although these positions are neither revolutionary nor new, there was a real sense during the first half of 2004 that the dividing lines between the two parties on foreign policy issues were being drawn ever sharper.1 Any period with a federal election in the middle of it is bound to accentuate the differences between the two major parties in Australian politics. Foreign policy, as Ungerer also notes, was heavily politicised during 2004. But despite this politicisation, a wealth

Journal

Australian Journal of Politics and HistoryWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2005

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