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Is overactive bladder a brain disease? The pathophysiological role of cerebral white matter in the elderly

Is overactive bladder a brain disease? The pathophysiological role of cerebral white matter in... Small‐vessel disease of the brain affecting the deep white matter characteristically manifests with neurological syndromes, such as vascular dementia and vascular parkinsonism. There is, however, compelling evidence to suggest that white matter disease can cause overactive bladder and incontinence, and in some patients these might be the initial manifestation. As white matter disease increases significantly with age, and preferentially affects the prefrontal deep white matter, white matter disease becomes an anatomical substrate in the brain etiology of overactive bladder. Treatment entails the management of small‐vessel disease risk factors and anticholinergic drugs that do not easily penetrate the blood–brain barrier, to improve bladder control. In short, when caring for elderly overactive‐bladder patients, we should look at both the brain and the bladder. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Urology Wiley

Is overactive bladder a brain disease? The pathophysiological role of cerebral white matter in the elderly

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References (93)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association
ISSN
0919-8172
eISSN
1442-2042
DOI
10.1111/iju.12288
pmid
24118122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Small‐vessel disease of the brain affecting the deep white matter characteristically manifests with neurological syndromes, such as vascular dementia and vascular parkinsonism. There is, however, compelling evidence to suggest that white matter disease can cause overactive bladder and incontinence, and in some patients these might be the initial manifestation. As white matter disease increases significantly with age, and preferentially affects the prefrontal deep white matter, white matter disease becomes an anatomical substrate in the brain etiology of overactive bladder. Treatment entails the management of small‐vessel disease risk factors and anticholinergic drugs that do not easily penetrate the blood–brain barrier, to improve bladder control. In short, when caring for elderly overactive‐bladder patients, we should look at both the brain and the bladder.

Journal

International Journal of UrologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2014

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

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