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Investigation of Factors Determining Genotypic Differences in Seed Yield of Non‐irrigated and Irrigated Chickpeas Using a Physiological Model of Yield Determination

Investigation of Factors Determining Genotypic Differences in Seed Yield of Non‐irrigated and... Physiological attributes determining yield, both under drought and under irrigated conditions, of some advanced chickpea lines of recent origin were investigated over two seasons using a physiological model. Total shoot biomass, grain yield, and vegetative (Dv) and reproductive (Dr) durations were measured and the crop growth rates (C) and the rate of partitioning to seed (p) were estimated. The contribution of model parameters to variations in grain yield were determined by path analysis, and the relationships of the yield determinants with seed yield were obtained by regression techniques. The model was found to be suitable for chickpea, and when the parameters were fitted the model explained 98% of the variation. Irrigation enhanced Dr and C. While C was the major single yield determinant, the combination of C and p in non‐irrigated environments explained most of the grain yield variation. Dv and Dr exhibited a negative relationship while C and p exhibited a positive relationship under drought stress and a negative relationship in the irrigated environment. There were indications of the existence of an optimum Dv for maximum C among the genotypes, suggesting the need to select for optimum duration genotypes. As high values for p and C in severe drought stress and Dr and C in the irrigated environments are advantageous for high yield, separate breeding strategies are needed for different soil water environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science Wiley

Investigation of Factors Determining Genotypic Differences in Seed Yield of Non‐irrigated and Irrigated Chickpeas Using a Physiological Model of Yield Determination

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0931-2250
eISSN
1439-037X
DOI
10.1046/j.1439-037x.1999.00306.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Physiological attributes determining yield, both under drought and under irrigated conditions, of some advanced chickpea lines of recent origin were investigated over two seasons using a physiological model. Total shoot biomass, grain yield, and vegetative (Dv) and reproductive (Dr) durations were measured and the crop growth rates (C) and the rate of partitioning to seed (p) were estimated. The contribution of model parameters to variations in grain yield were determined by path analysis, and the relationships of the yield determinants with seed yield were obtained by regression techniques. The model was found to be suitable for chickpea, and when the parameters were fitted the model explained 98% of the variation. Irrigation enhanced Dr and C. While C was the major single yield determinant, the combination of C and p in non‐irrigated environments explained most of the grain yield variation. Dv and Dr exhibited a negative relationship while C and p exhibited a positive relationship under drought stress and a negative relationship in the irrigated environment. There were indications of the existence of an optimum Dv for maximum C among the genotypes, suggesting the need to select for optimum duration genotypes. As high values for p and C in severe drought stress and Dr and C in the irrigated environments are advantageous for high yield, separate breeding strategies are needed for different soil water environments.

Journal

Journal of Agronomy and Crop ScienceWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

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