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Influences of the Early Eighteenth‐Century Social Minuet on the Minuets From J. S. Bach’s French Suites, BWV 812‐17

Influences of the Early Eighteenth‐Century Social Minuet on the Minuets From J. S. Bach’s French... An earlier version of this article was given at the 1996 annual meeting of the Society for Music Theory (Baton Rouge). The author thanks William Rothstein, Robert Hatten, Michael Broyles and Laura Macy for their helpful comments on earlier drafts. Music Analysis, 18/ii (1999) © Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 1999. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK ERIC M C KEE from composing dance music? In addressing the first of these questions, the first part of this article focuses on the practical aspects of the most important social dance of the eighteenth century, the minuet – and specifically the ballroom version of the menuet, the menuet ordinaire. An examination of eighteenthcentury dance treatises reveals that the practical necessity of the minuet is not a particular type of phrase structure, as is commonly believed, but rather the presence of consistently maintained metrical levels above the notated metre in which bars are organised in terms of strong and weak beats – what is commonly referred to today as hypermetre.4 The second part of the article explores the influence of the danced minuet as seen in the minuets of Bach’s French Suites. Out of the seven minuets, I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Influences of the Early Eighteenth‐Century Social Minuet on the Minuets From J. S. Bach’s French Suites, BWV 812‐17

Music Analysis , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Publishers Ltd 1999
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00092
Publisher site
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Abstract

An earlier version of this article was given at the 1996 annual meeting of the Society for Music Theory (Baton Rouge). The author thanks William Rothstein, Robert Hatten, Michael Broyles and Laura Macy for their helpful comments on earlier drafts. Music Analysis, 18/ii (1999) © Blackwell Publishers Ltd. 1999. Published by Blackwell Publishers, 108 Cowley Road, Oxford OX4 1JF, UK ERIC M C KEE from composing dance music? In addressing the first of these questions, the first part of this article focuses on the practical aspects of the most important social dance of the eighteenth century, the minuet – and specifically the ballroom version of the menuet, the menuet ordinaire. An examination of eighteenthcentury dance treatises reveals that the practical necessity of the minuet is not a particular type of phrase structure, as is commonly believed, but rather the presence of consistently maintained metrical levels above the notated metre in which bars are organised in terms of strong and weak beats – what is commonly referred to today as hypermetre.4 The second part of the article explores the influence of the danced minuet as seen in the minuets of Bach’s French Suites. Out of the seven minuets, I

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1999

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