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Infants’ sense of approximate numerosity: Heritability and link to other concurrent traits

Infants’ sense of approximate numerosity: Heritability and link to other concurrent traits INTRODUCTIONThe Approximate Number System (ANS) is believed to be dedicated to the perception of approximate numerosity, without relying on language or symbols (Feigenson et al., 2004). The ability to differentiate between approximate numerosity increases during the first year of life in human infants (Xu et al., 2005) and stable individual differences emerge (Libertus & Brannon, 2010). The ANS has also been found in non‐human animals (Boysen & Hallberg, 2000; Kilian et al., 2003), suggesting an evolutionary importance of the ANS (Halberda et al., 2008). In older children and adults, ANS acuity is typically measured by comparing simultaneously presented stimuli, such as quickly flashing dots, asking the participants which group of stimuli contained more objects (i.e., dots in this example; Odic & Starr et al., 2018). In this case, the ANS acuity of a specific individual is usually defined as the smallest ratio that the individual can reliably discriminate (Odic & Starr, 2018). In infants, ANS is usually measured by habituation paradigms, or by preferential looking to one of two simultaneously presented streams of dots (one having the same number of dots and one changing in numerosity). In this study, we used the preferential looking paradigm, where the ANS score reflects the preference for looking http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

Infants’ sense of approximate numerosity: Heritability and link to other concurrent traits

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13347
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe Approximate Number System (ANS) is believed to be dedicated to the perception of approximate numerosity, without relying on language or symbols (Feigenson et al., 2004). The ability to differentiate between approximate numerosity increases during the first year of life in human infants (Xu et al., 2005) and stable individual differences emerge (Libertus & Brannon, 2010). The ANS has also been found in non‐human animals (Boysen & Hallberg, 2000; Kilian et al., 2003), suggesting an evolutionary importance of the ANS (Halberda et al., 2008). In older children and adults, ANS acuity is typically measured by comparing simultaneously presented stimuli, such as quickly flashing dots, asking the participants which group of stimuli contained more objects (i.e., dots in this example; Odic & Starr et al., 2018). In this case, the ANS acuity of a specific individual is usually defined as the smallest ratio that the individual can reliably discriminate (Odic & Starr, 2018). In infants, ANS is usually measured by habituation paradigms, or by preferential looking to one of two simultaneously presented streams of dots (one having the same number of dots and one changing in numerosity). In this study, we used the preferential looking paradigm, where the ANS score reflects the preference for looking

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 17, 2022

Keywords: ANS; approximate number system; development; infancy; non‐verbal ability; twins

References