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Impaired immunologic reactivity and recurrence following cancer surgery

Impaired immunologic reactivity and recurrence following cancer surgery One hundred patients were tested for their ability to react to 7 commonly encountered skin test antigens and to develop delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to 2, 4‐dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB). Following sensitization, more than 95% of normal patients, but only 60% of patients with potentially resectable neoplasms, exhibited delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to DNCB. A correlation is suggested between the inability to react to DNCB and the incidence of either inoperability, local recurrence, or distant metastases within 6 months post‐operatively. Ninety‐three percent (27/29) of patients who failed to react to DNCB were inoperable or developed early recurrence, whereas 92% (50/54) of patients who reacted to DNCB were free of disease for 6 months; but many of these patients were nonreactive to all of the common skin test antigens. These studies suggest that there is a significant correlation between cell mediated immunologic reactivity as measured by delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to DNCB and the course of malignant disease following definitive cancer surgery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Wiley

Impaired immunologic reactivity and recurrence following cancer surgery

Cancer , Volume 25 (2) – Feb 1, 1970

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References (39)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1970 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0008-543X
eISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/1097-0142(197002)25:2<362::AID-CNCR2820250213>3.0.CO;2-V
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One hundred patients were tested for their ability to react to 7 commonly encountered skin test antigens and to develop delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to 2, 4‐dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB). Following sensitization, more than 95% of normal patients, but only 60% of patients with potentially resectable neoplasms, exhibited delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to DNCB. A correlation is suggested between the inability to react to DNCB and the incidence of either inoperability, local recurrence, or distant metastases within 6 months post‐operatively. Ninety‐three percent (27/29) of patients who failed to react to DNCB were inoperable or developed early recurrence, whereas 92% (50/54) of patients who reacted to DNCB were free of disease for 6 months; but many of these patients were nonreactive to all of the common skin test antigens. These studies suggest that there is a significant correlation between cell mediated immunologic reactivity as measured by delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity to DNCB and the course of malignant disease following definitive cancer surgery.

Journal

CancerWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1970

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