Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Ihr Bild (August 1828): Song by Franz Schubert to a Lyric by Heinrich Heine

Ihr Bild (August 1828): Song by Franz Schubert to a Lyric by Heinrich Heine F RANZ S CHUBERT TO A Traditionally, there are two main ways of celebrating a great thinker: through scholarship and through new thought. Scholarship, as we know, tells us who a thinker is or was, and labours at clarification of his or her work through critical editions, exegesis, archival research, translation, biography, cultural history, and so forth. Its activity is essential: without such a responsibility to the past there can be no responsible present or future. New thought, on the other hand, does not just recycle old ideas, but raises the question: If the thinker had continued into later times, how would his or her thought have evolved? To canonise great work, on the other hand, and to allow it no further evolution or even self-contradiction, is to strike at the heart of thought itself. Where there is no novelty or readiness to adapt, there can be no life of the mind: hence the danger behind the allure of ‘schools of thought’. This article and the one that follows it embody this double celebration; taken together, they are intended to throw light on Schenker’s hermeneutics. The first, representing scholarship, is by Schenker himself in a translation by Robert http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Ihr Bild (August 1828): Song by Franz Schubert to a Lyric by Heinrich Heine

Music Analysis , Volume 19 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/ihr-bild-august-1828-song-by-franz-schubert-to-a-lyric-by-heinrich-xXraqeJz8Q
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/1468-2249.00106
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

F RANZ S CHUBERT TO A Traditionally, there are two main ways of celebrating a great thinker: through scholarship and through new thought. Scholarship, as we know, tells us who a thinker is or was, and labours at clarification of his or her work through critical editions, exegesis, archival research, translation, biography, cultural history, and so forth. Its activity is essential: without such a responsibility to the past there can be no responsible present or future. New thought, on the other hand, does not just recycle old ideas, but raises the question: If the thinker had continued into later times, how would his or her thought have evolved? To canonise great work, on the other hand, and to allow it no further evolution or even self-contradiction, is to strike at the heart of thought itself. Where there is no novelty or readiness to adapt, there can be no life of the mind: hence the danger behind the allure of ‘schools of thought’. This article and the one that follows it embody this double celebration; taken together, they are intended to throw light on Schenker’s hermeneutics. The first, representing scholarship, is by Schenker himself in a translation by Robert

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.