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I nside L uciano B erio 's S erialism

I nside L uciano B erio 's S erialism ABSTRACT Like many other composers who later distanced themselves from serialism, Luciano Berio (1925–2003) embraced its principles in the 1950s and beyond. While Berio's early serial techniques from the Due pezzi of 1951 to Nones of 1954 are well known, his subsequent serial practice is still little understood for three principal reasons: in his writings and interviews Berio provided only limited information on his serial works; it is very difficult to decipher Berio's later complex serial techniques from the published scores alone; and only one sketch survives for any of his serial works from 1951 to 1958 (for Allelujah I, 1955–6). Following a brief examination of the integral serialism in Nones (whose principles have been known for some time thanks to an analytical note by Berio), the present study investigates the serial techniques deployed in the Quartetto per archi (1955–6) and Allelujah I. Berio's serial materials are reconstructed with the help of distributional analyses and from an historical angle that has been little explored thus far: the influence of Bruno Maderna (1920–1973), Berio's mentor and close collaborator at the Studio di fonologia musicale in Milan. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

I nside L uciano B erio 's S erialism

Music Analysis , Volume 28 (2‐3) – Jul 1, 2009

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2011 The Author. Music Analysis © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.1468-2249.2011.00275.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Like many other composers who later distanced themselves from serialism, Luciano Berio (1925–2003) embraced its principles in the 1950s and beyond. While Berio's early serial techniques from the Due pezzi of 1951 to Nones of 1954 are well known, his subsequent serial practice is still little understood for three principal reasons: in his writings and interviews Berio provided only limited information on his serial works; it is very difficult to decipher Berio's later complex serial techniques from the published scores alone; and only one sketch survives for any of his serial works from 1951 to 1958 (for Allelujah I, 1955–6). Following a brief examination of the integral serialism in Nones (whose principles have been known for some time thanks to an analytical note by Berio), the present study investigates the serial techniques deployed in the Quartetto per archi (1955–6) and Allelujah I. Berio's serial materials are reconstructed with the help of distributional analyses and from an historical angle that has been little explored thus far: the influence of Bruno Maderna (1920–1973), Berio's mentor and close collaborator at the Studio di fonologia musicale in Milan.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2009

References