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How We Got Out of Analysis, and How to Get Back In Again

How We Got Out of Analysis, and How to Get Back In Again ANALYSIS, AND HOW TO GET BACK IN 1980. Joseph Kerman, Professor of Music at a state university in California, and a leading voice in musicology, publishes `How We Got into Analysis, and How to Get Out'.1 This is only two years after the formation of the Society for Music Theory. Just when theorists and analysts in America succeed in constituting themselves into a separate society, just when they win the opportunity to focus on what they deem important and what they think they are good at, and just when they think they have finally escaped the hegemonic rule of the American Musicological Society, they find themselves under attack. 1985. Kerman has another go at analysis. This time critique is extended to other areas of musicology (the early music movement, ethnomusicology and traditions of performing practices, among others).2 We are urged to look beyond formalism and positivism, and to embrace criticism, especially his brand of criticism. Interpretations, not facts, are in short supply, we are told. 1990s. The New Musicology joins the fray, furthering the critique of formalism, and issuing a series of manifestos about how not to study and write about music.3 Its spirited but sometimes reckless writing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

How We Got Out of Analysis, and How to Get Back In Again

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (2‐3) – Jul 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00204.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANALYSIS, AND HOW TO GET BACK IN 1980. Joseph Kerman, Professor of Music at a state university in California, and a leading voice in musicology, publishes `How We Got into Analysis, and How to Get Out'.1 This is only two years after the formation of the Society for Music Theory. Just when theorists and analysts in America succeed in constituting themselves into a separate society, just when they win the opportunity to focus on what they deem important and what they think they are good at, and just when they think they have finally escaped the hegemonic rule of the American Musicological Society, they find themselves under attack. 1985. Kerman has another go at analysis. This time critique is extended to other areas of musicology (the early music movement, ethnomusicology and traditions of performing practices, among others).2 We are urged to look beyond formalism and positivism, and to embrace criticism, especially his brand of criticism. Interpretations, not facts, are in short supply, we are told. 1990s. The New Musicology joins the fray, furthering the critique of formalism, and issuing a series of manifestos about how not to study and write about music.3 Its spirited but sometimes reckless writing

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2004

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