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High‐Throughput Field Phenotyping to Assess Irrigation Treatment Effects in Quinoa

High‐Throughput Field Phenotyping to Assess Irrigation Treatment Effects in Quinoa AbbreviationsAGLabove ground levelANOVAanalysis of varianceBBCHBiologische Bundesanstalt, Bundessortenamt, CHemische IndustrieCSCrop ScanGgreenGNDVIgreen normalized difference vegetation indexLSDleast significance differenceNDVInormalized difference vegetation indexNIRnear infraredPROproximalRredUASunmanned aerial systemWBIwater band indexQuinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a dicot annual species that belongs to the family Amaranthaceae, which include important plant species such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), and other weed species (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014). Quinoa is known for its high nutritional value with high protein content (about 16%) and right balance of carbohydrate, essential amino acids, minerals, and essential oil (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014). Moreover, quinoa is a good source of vitamins, oil with high linoleate and linolenate content (55–66% of the lipid fraction), natural antioxidants, and minerals (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014; Wu, 2015). Due to exceptional nutritional value and tolerance of abiotic stresses with wide genetic diversity, quinoa is gaining global attention (Murphy et al., 2016; Hinojosa et al., 2018). However, it is important to develop/identify varieties that are adapted to local environmental conditions (altitude, temperature, humidity) for enhanced productivity. In this regard, quinoa breeding programs offer additional opportunity for further crop adaptation to local agro‐ecological conditions (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014; Jarvis et al., 2017). Crop phenotyping refers to comprehensive assessment http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

High‐Throughput Field Phenotyping to Assess Irrigation Treatment Effects in Quinoa

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.12.0063
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsAGLabove ground levelANOVAanalysis of varianceBBCHBiologische Bundesanstalt, Bundessortenamt, CHemische IndustrieCSCrop ScanGgreenGNDVIgreen normalized difference vegetation indexLSDleast significance differenceNDVInormalized difference vegetation indexNIRnear infraredPROproximalRredUASunmanned aerial systemWBIwater band indexQuinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a dicot annual species that belongs to the family Amaranthaceae, which include important plant species such as spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), and other weed species (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014). Quinoa is known for its high nutritional value with high protein content (about 16%) and right balance of carbohydrate, essential amino acids, minerals, and essential oil (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014). Moreover, quinoa is a good source of vitamins, oil with high linoleate and linolenate content (55–66% of the lipid fraction), natural antioxidants, and minerals (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014; Wu, 2015). Due to exceptional nutritional value and tolerance of abiotic stresses with wide genetic diversity, quinoa is gaining global attention (Murphy et al., 2016; Hinojosa et al., 2018). However, it is important to develop/identify varieties that are adapted to local environmental conditions (altitude, temperature, humidity) for enhanced productivity. In this regard, quinoa breeding programs offer additional opportunity for further crop adaptation to local agro‐ecological conditions (Zurita‐Silva et al., 2014; Jarvis et al., 2017). Crop phenotyping refers to comprehensive assessment

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References