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Guido Heldt, Music and Levels of Narration in Film: Steps Across the Border (Bristol and Chicago: Intellect, 2013). x + 292 pp. ISBN 978‐1‐84150‐625‐8. £48.50 (hb).

Guido Heldt, Music and Levels of Narration in Film: Steps Across the Border (Bristol and Chicago:... The diegetic/non‐diegetic distinction is the Tristan chord of film‐music theory. Whatever the scoring style, cues become fascinatingly ambiguous if one asks, ‘But where is the music?’ – and everyone has an opinion. For instance, when Luke, Obi‐Wan and the droids pilot a landspeeder across Tatooine in Star Wars (1977), John Williams's music appears straightforwardly non‐diegetic. It does not seem to issue, in other words, from the fictional universe (the diegesis) within which the movie entices one to imagine Star Wars taking place. Instead, one experiences it as a facet of the film's narrative discourse, as a component of how the story is being told – akin, say, to cutting and framing. The characters cannot hear it; the music is for the audience only. However, when the ageing Jedi and his new apprentice enter the bar in Mos Eisley a few moments later, Williams's underscore has gone – and yet still there is music. Non‐human wind players perform straightforwardly diegetic audio, that is, music within the fictional universe. The Jedi, presumably, can hear the music too.Before one can say ‘Han shot first’, however, doubts may creep into such analyses. For one thing, Figrin D'an and the Modal Nodes are playing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Guido Heldt, Music and Levels of Narration in Film: Steps Across the Border (Bristol and Chicago: Intellect, 2013). x + 292 pp. ISBN 978‐1‐84150‐625‐8. £48.50 (hb).

Music Analysis , Volume 37 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The diegetic/non‐diegetic distinction is the Tristan chord of film‐music theory. Whatever the scoring style, cues become fascinatingly ambiguous if one asks, ‘But where is the music?’ – and everyone has an opinion. For instance, when Luke, Obi‐Wan and the droids pilot a landspeeder across Tatooine in Star Wars (1977), John Williams's music appears straightforwardly non‐diegetic. It does not seem to issue, in other words, from the fictional universe (the diegesis) within which the movie entices one to imagine Star Wars taking place. Instead, one experiences it as a facet of the film's narrative discourse, as a component of how the story is being told – akin, say, to cutting and framing. The characters cannot hear it; the music is for the audience only. However, when the ageing Jedi and his new apprentice enter the bar in Mos Eisley a few moments later, Williams's underscore has gone – and yet still there is music. Non‐human wind players perform straightforwardly diegetic audio, that is, music within the fictional universe. The Jedi, presumably, can hear the music too.Before one can say ‘Han shot first’, however, doubts may creep into such analyses. For one thing, Figrin D'an and the Modal Nodes are playing

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References