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Group cognitive behavioural therapy with cancer patients: the views of women participants on a short‐term intervention

Group cognitive behavioural therapy with cancer patients: the views of women participants on a... At present many emotionally distressed cancer patients receive no psychological intervention. The aim of this paper is to examine and report qualitatively on the experiences of a small group of seven newly diagnosed women who underwent a group cognitive behavioural therapy (GCBT) programme. The GCBT programme was part of a larger piece of research comparing patients’ experiences of GCBT with that of group social support or no group programme of support. Following the 8‐week GCBT programme, qualitative analysis of interview data revealed that patients had learned the skills required to challenge and solve problems and to use the cognitive model and effectively employ behavioural exercises to generate improved coping. The results also suggest that a GCBT programme with newly diagnosed cancer patients may need to allow cancer patients considerable opportunities to ventilate feelings and engage in social support with other patients; this being regarded as a highly valuable component to build into a GCBT programme. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Group cognitive behavioural therapy with cancer patients: the views of women participants on a short‐term intervention

European Journal of Cancer Care , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Science Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2354.1998.00064.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At present many emotionally distressed cancer patients receive no psychological intervention. The aim of this paper is to examine and report qualitatively on the experiences of a small group of seven newly diagnosed women who underwent a group cognitive behavioural therapy (GCBT) programme. The GCBT programme was part of a larger piece of research comparing patients’ experiences of GCBT with that of group social support or no group programme of support. Following the 8‐week GCBT programme, qualitative analysis of interview data revealed that patients had learned the skills required to challenge and solve problems and to use the cognitive model and effectively employ behavioural exercises to generate improved coping. The results also suggest that a GCBT programme with newly diagnosed cancer patients may need to allow cancer patients considerable opportunities to ventilate feelings and engage in social support with other patients; this being regarded as a highly valuable component to build into a GCBT programme.

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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