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Fin‐de‐siè Wagner: Parsifal Analysed Through Berg's Programme to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

Fin‐de‐siè Wagner: Parsifal Analysed Through Berg's Programme to Mahler's Ninth Symphony Music Analysis, 23/i (2004) ß Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2005. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK NICHOLAS BARAGWANATH for as long as he can. He wants to create for himself a home, far away from all troubles, in the free and thin air of Semmering, to drink this air, this purest earthly air with deeper and deeper breaths ± deeper and deeper breaths [Fig. 1 Mahler, Symphony No. 9, first movement, horns bars 443±53] so that the heart, this most wonderful heart ever to have beaten among men, widens ± widens more and more ± before it must stop beating.4 Berg's account is by no means simply an isolated, individual response to the work. Many similar interpretations, sharing common themes of farewell to life, and of death and transfiguration, were published following the premiere. Constantin Floros has identified seventeen such reviews in Austrian newspapers and journals alone.5 In addition, Mahler's hand-written comments in the orchestral draft,6 which were not included in the published score, offer evidence in support of these readings. Floros suggests that Berg was aware of Mahler's inscriptions while writing his `programme', having received the orchestral draft of the first three movements http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Fin‐de‐siè Wagner: Parsifal Analysed Through Berg's Programme to Mahler's Ninth Symphony

Music Analysis , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 1, 2004

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/j.0262-5245.2004.00194.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music Analysis, 23/i (2004) ß Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2005. Published by Blackwell Publishing, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK NICHOLAS BARAGWANATH for as long as he can. He wants to create for himself a home, far away from all troubles, in the free and thin air of Semmering, to drink this air, this purest earthly air with deeper and deeper breaths ± deeper and deeper breaths [Fig. 1 Mahler, Symphony No. 9, first movement, horns bars 443±53] so that the heart, this most wonderful heart ever to have beaten among men, widens ± widens more and more ± before it must stop beating.4 Berg's account is by no means simply an isolated, individual response to the work. Many similar interpretations, sharing common themes of farewell to life, and of death and transfiguration, were published following the premiere. Constantin Floros has identified seventeen such reviews in Austrian newspapers and journals alone.5 In addition, Mahler's hand-written comments in the orchestral draft,6 which were not included in the published score, offer evidence in support of these readings. Floros suggests that Berg was aware of Mahler's inscriptions while writing his `programme', having received the orchestral draft of the first three movements

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2004

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