Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Field Calibration of PR2 Capacitance Probe in Pullman Clay‐Loam Soil of Southern High Plains

Field Calibration of PR2 Capacitance Probe in Pullman Clay‐Loam Soil of Southern High Plains AbbreviationsEMelectromagneticRMSEroot mean square errorVWCvolumetric water contentAccurate measurement of soil water content is essential to characterize soil water dynamics and use for irrigation scheduling. The simplest and most precise method of soil water measurement is the gravimetric technique (Gardner, 1986), which is widely used for the calibration of other methods. This method is labor‐intensive, slow, invasive, destructive for use in controlled environments (Mwale et al., 2005), and impossible at a fine time scale (e.g., minutes). Introduction of the neutron scattering method revolutionized indirect measurement of in situ volumetric water content (VWC, water volume/soil volume ratio) in the early 1950s (Gardner and Kirkham, 1952). Several modifications in sensors and calibration of this method led to its high reliability and widespread use (Evett and Steiner, 1995). However, the use of the neutron scattering technique requires licensing and periodic safety training for compliance with existing radioactive hazard regulations, which is expensive and a burden to researchers (Fares et al., 2004). Neutron probes are also difficult to maintain, constitute a potential radiation hazard to users, and prevent use with unattended monitoring (Mwale et al., 2005). As an alternative, the electromagnetic (EM) probes or dielectric methods were introduced in the late 1980s and 1990s (Evett http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Field Calibration of PR2 Capacitance Probe in Pullman Clay‐Loam Soil of Southern High Plains

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/field-calibration-of-pr2-capacitance-probe-in-pullman-clay-loam-soil-unHb1pyKsg
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.10.0043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsEMelectromagneticRMSEroot mean square errorVWCvolumetric water contentAccurate measurement of soil water content is essential to characterize soil water dynamics and use for irrigation scheduling. The simplest and most precise method of soil water measurement is the gravimetric technique (Gardner, 1986), which is widely used for the calibration of other methods. This method is labor‐intensive, slow, invasive, destructive for use in controlled environments (Mwale et al., 2005), and impossible at a fine time scale (e.g., minutes). Introduction of the neutron scattering method revolutionized indirect measurement of in situ volumetric water content (VWC, water volume/soil volume ratio) in the early 1950s (Gardner and Kirkham, 1952). Several modifications in sensors and calibration of this method led to its high reliability and widespread use (Evett and Steiner, 1995). However, the use of the neutron scattering technique requires licensing and periodic safety training for compliance with existing radioactive hazard regulations, which is expensive and a burden to researchers (Fares et al., 2004). Neutron probes are also difficult to maintain, constitute a potential radiation hazard to users, and prevent use with unattended monitoring (Mwale et al., 2005). As an alternative, the electromagnetic (EM) probes or dielectric methods were introduced in the late 1980s and 1990s (Evett

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References