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Felix Wörner, Ullrich Scheideler and Philip Rupprecht (eds), Tonality 1900–1950: Concept and Practice (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2012). £34.80. 276 pp. ISBN 978‐3‐515‐10160‐8

Felix Wörner, Ullrich Scheideler and Philip Rupprecht (eds), Tonality 1900–1950: Concept and... This book contributes to a respectable and ever‐enlarging body of studies of twentieth‐century tonality. Emerging from a conference of the same name held jointly at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2010, the dates in its title seem both to invite and to discourage the expectation that the book will provide some kind of historical overview. The introduction repeatedly refers to ‘the 1900–1950 period’, but it is not immediately obvious what constitutes this as a period in musical or general historical terms. Had the dates been 1908–45, then we might suppose that the period between Schoenberg's Second String Quartet and Britten's Peter Grimes could be considered a moment of first contact between centuries‐old tonality and its most viable modern alternatives. As it happens, the music – the ‘practice’ – examined in the book ranges from 1913 (Vaughan Williams's London Symphony ) to 1959 (Barber's Nocturne ), and the theory – the ‘concept’ – from Schoenberg's Harmonielehre (1911) to Hindemith's late thoughts in the 1960s. Although it does not offer a historical conspectus, then, the book presents a sequence of fifteen case studies covering the development of both theory and composition in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Felix Wörner, Ullrich Scheideler and Philip Rupprecht (eds), Tonality 1900–1950: Concept and Practice (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2012). £34.80. 276 pp. ISBN 978‐3‐515‐10160‐8

Music Analysis , Volume 33 (3) – Jan 1, 2014

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This book contributes to a respectable and ever‐enlarging body of studies of twentieth‐century tonality. Emerging from a conference of the same name held jointly at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2010, the dates in its title seem both to invite and to discourage the expectation that the book will provide some kind of historical overview. The introduction repeatedly refers to ‘the 1900–1950 period’, but it is not immediately obvious what constitutes this as a period in musical or general historical terms. Had the dates been 1908–45, then we might suppose that the period between Schoenberg's Second String Quartet and Britten's Peter Grimes could be considered a moment of first contact between centuries‐old tonality and its most viable modern alternatives. As it happens, the music – the ‘practice’ – examined in the book ranges from 1913 (Vaughan Williams's London Symphony ) to 1959 (Barber's Nocturne ), and the theory – the ‘concept’ – from Schoenberg's Harmonielehre (1911) to Hindemith's late thoughts in the 1960s. Although it does not offer a historical conspectus, then, the book presents a sequence of fifteen case studies covering the development of both theory and composition in the

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2014

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