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Famine: A Short History

Famine: A Short History Famine: A Short History , edited by Cormac ÓGráda . Published by Princeton University Press , Princeton , 2009 , pp . xv + 327 , ISBN 978‐0‐691‐12237‐3 . Famine has not been a focus of Australian agricultural and resource economics, although our profession has helped keep it at bay through its contributions to agricultural and rural development, multilateral trade expansion, analyses of impacts of food aid and assessments of world food security. Cormac ÓGráda’s short history of famine concludes that advances on these fronts have been helping to hobble ‘the third horseman of the apocalypse’, but his final demise is by no means assured. ÓGráda is an Irish economic historian who has published widely on the causes and impacts of regional famine. In his short history, he has marshalled anecdotes and legends about famines in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, cited documented facts about famines in pre‐industrial Europe and Asia and critically analysed several nineteenth, twentieth and early 21st century famines. Famine is a slippery concept, ranging from endemic malnutrition in poor communities to mortality from starvation caused by natural disasters or political events. Yet, it is important to get our thinking right about famine. Although it can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Australian Journal of Agricultural Resource Economics Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1364-985X
eISSN
1467-8489
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-8489.2011.00538.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Famine: A Short History , edited by Cormac ÓGráda . Published by Princeton University Press , Princeton , 2009 , pp . xv + 327 , ISBN 978‐0‐691‐12237‐3 . Famine has not been a focus of Australian agricultural and resource economics, although our profession has helped keep it at bay through its contributions to agricultural and rural development, multilateral trade expansion, analyses of impacts of food aid and assessments of world food security. Cormac ÓGráda’s short history of famine concludes that advances on these fronts have been helping to hobble ‘the third horseman of the apocalypse’, but his final demise is by no means assured. ÓGráda is an Irish economic historian who has published widely on the causes and impacts of regional famine. In his short history, he has marshalled anecdotes and legends about famines in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, cited documented facts about famines in pre‐industrial Europe and Asia and critically analysed several nineteenth, twentieth and early 21st century famines. Famine is a slippery concept, ranging from endemic malnutrition in poor communities to mortality from starvation caused by natural disasters or political events. Yet, it is important to get our thinking right about famine. Although it can

Journal

The Australian Journal of Agricultural Resource EconomicsWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2011

References