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Extrinsic emotional regulation experienced by lung cancer patients and their family caregivers during progression‐free survival

Extrinsic emotional regulation experienced by lung cancer patients and their family caregivers... INTRODUCTIONLung cancer, as one of the most fatal diseases, accounted for 11.4% of new cancer cases worldwide in 2020. In China, epidemiology studies found an estimated 815,563 new diagnoses of lung cancer in 2020, and 714,699 people died from the disease in the same year (Cao et al., 2021; Sung et al., 2021). As new therapies are developed and the disease is diagnosed earlier, healthcare providers tended to replace overall survival with progression‐free survival (PFS), which refers to the time from random assignment in a clinical trial to disease progression or mortality (Gutman et al., 2013). As a result, patients tended to view progression‐free survival (PFS) as a putative surrogate end point of cancer treatments, after balancing the pros and cons of treatments (Raphael et al., 2019). In this way, PFS created a coexistence of living and dying for cancer patients, in which psychosocial consequences has not been adequately addressed in the literature (Arantzamendi et al., 2020).Previous studies identified cancer trajectory as a significant stressor for patients, which is not only physically and financially burdensome but also emotionally provoking (Su et al., 2021; Tan et al., 2018; Teixeira et al., 2018). Chinese lung cancer patients reported higher levels of psychological distress, mainly manifested as depression and anxiety http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Extrinsic emotional regulation experienced by lung cancer patients and their family caregivers during progression‐free survival

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13750
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONLung cancer, as one of the most fatal diseases, accounted for 11.4% of new cancer cases worldwide in 2020. In China, epidemiology studies found an estimated 815,563 new diagnoses of lung cancer in 2020, and 714,699 people died from the disease in the same year (Cao et al., 2021; Sung et al., 2021). As new therapies are developed and the disease is diagnosed earlier, healthcare providers tended to replace overall survival with progression‐free survival (PFS), which refers to the time from random assignment in a clinical trial to disease progression or mortality (Gutman et al., 2013). As a result, patients tended to view progression‐free survival (PFS) as a putative surrogate end point of cancer treatments, after balancing the pros and cons of treatments (Raphael et al., 2019). In this way, PFS created a coexistence of living and dying for cancer patients, in which psychosocial consequences has not been adequately addressed in the literature (Arantzamendi et al., 2020).Previous studies identified cancer trajectory as a significant stressor for patients, which is not only physically and financially burdensome but also emotionally provoking (Su et al., 2021; Tan et al., 2018; Teixeira et al., 2018). Chinese lung cancer patients reported higher levels of psychological distress, mainly manifested as depression and anxiety

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: caregiver; China; extrinsic emotional regulation; lung cancer; patient

References