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Evaluation of High‐Yielding Canadian Soybean Cultivars Suited to Japanese Growing Conditions

Evaluation of High‐Yielding Canadian Soybean Cultivars Suited to Japanese Growing Conditions AbbreviationsANOVAanalysis of varianceDRsoybean cultivar OAC DoradoTMsoybean cultivar ToyomusumeYHsoybean cultivar YukihomareThe broadening of genetic diversity is essential to improving the seed yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and exotic germplasms can be a source of new alleles that improve yield (Kim et al., 2012; Li et al., 2008; Palomeque et al., 2009a, 2009b). The development of high‐yielding lines derived from exotic germplasms may provide new genetic diversity to enrich the gene pool, which theoretically could increase the rate of yield increases in soybean cultivars (Nelson and Johnson, 2012).Seed yields of late‐maturing soybean isolines can be greater than seed yields of early maturing isolines (Cober et al., 2010; Yamada et al., 2012). In Hokkaido, northern Japan, the growing period of soybean is restricted because of a short fall season and early snowfall (Yamaguchi et al., 2015). In North America, soybean cultivars have been categorized into 13 maturity groups based on the climate and latitude to which they are adapted (Jia et al., 2014; Zhang et al., 2007). Maturity groups range from 000 for the very early maturing cultivars to X for the latest maturing cultivars. The leading cultivars in Hokkaido belong to maturity groups 0 to I (Yamaguchi et al., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Evaluation of High‐Yielding Canadian Soybean Cultivars Suited to Japanese Growing Conditions

6 pages

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2018.12.0061
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsANOVAanalysis of varianceDRsoybean cultivar OAC DoradoTMsoybean cultivar ToyomusumeYHsoybean cultivar YukihomareThe broadening of genetic diversity is essential to improving the seed yield of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and exotic germplasms can be a source of new alleles that improve yield (Kim et al., 2012; Li et al., 2008; Palomeque et al., 2009a, 2009b). The development of high‐yielding lines derived from exotic germplasms may provide new genetic diversity to enrich the gene pool, which theoretically could increase the rate of yield increases in soybean cultivars (Nelson and Johnson, 2012).Seed yields of late‐maturing soybean isolines can be greater than seed yields of early maturing isolines (Cober et al., 2010; Yamada et al., 2012). In Hokkaido, northern Japan, the growing period of soybean is restricted because of a short fall season and early snowfall (Yamaguchi et al., 2015). In North America, soybean cultivars have been categorized into 13 maturity groups based on the climate and latitude to which they are adapted (Jia et al., 2014; Zhang et al., 2007). Maturity groups range from 000 for the very early maturing cultivars to X for the latest maturing cultivars. The leading cultivars in Hokkaido belong to maturity groups 0 to I (Yamaguchi et al.,

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References