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Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizers in Minimizing Nitrogen Losses in Irrigated Russet Potato

Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizers in Minimizing Nitrogen Losses in Irrigated Russet Potato AbbreviationsDAPdays after plantingDCDdicyandiamideEEFenhanced efficiency fertilizersESNEnvironmentally Smart NitrogenGSgrowers’ standardMTYmarketable tuber yieldNBPTN‐(n‐butyl thiophosphoric triamideNInitrification inhibitorNUEnitrogen use efficiencyPCUpolymer‐coated ureaQRquadratic regressionIncreasing environmental health concerns associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer losses that result in eutrophication, groundwater contamination, and greenhouse gas emissions are requiring producers to improve N use efficiency (NUE). Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) need a significant amount of N supply (225 kg N ha−1 N2O) to obtain a yield of ≥60 Mg ha−1 and to maintain quality tubers under irrigated condition (Franzen, 2018). The isotope tracer technique indicates that plants utilize 29 to 77% of applied N fertilizer, and the difference method (i.e., the difference between fertilized and unfertilized) predicts 40 to 60% of fertilizer N recovery (Li et al., 2003; Roberts et al., 1991; Zebarth et al., 2004; Zvomuya et al., 2002). A significant portion of fertilizer‐N is subjected to loss through ammonia (NH3) volatilization, gaseous [nitrous oxide (N2O) and N2] emission, and nitrate (NO3−) leaching beyond the active root zone.Ammonia volatilization is most likely to occur in calcareous soils, soils with low buffering capacity, and soils with accumulation of crop residues on surface (Fenn and Hossner, 1985). Ammonia escaped from soil through volatilization can cause eutrophication and soil acidification (Zebarth and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment" Wiley

Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizers in Minimizing Nitrogen Losses in Irrigated Russet Potato

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© American Society of Agronomy
eISSN
2639-6696
DOI
10.2134/age2019.06.0047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsDAPdays after plantingDCDdicyandiamideEEFenhanced efficiency fertilizersESNEnvironmentally Smart NitrogenGSgrowers’ standardMTYmarketable tuber yieldNBPTN‐(n‐butyl thiophosphoric triamideNInitrification inhibitorNUEnitrogen use efficiencyPCUpolymer‐coated ureaQRquadratic regressionIncreasing environmental health concerns associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer losses that result in eutrophication, groundwater contamination, and greenhouse gas emissions are requiring producers to improve N use efficiency (NUE). Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) need a significant amount of N supply (225 kg N ha−1 N2O) to obtain a yield of ≥60 Mg ha−1 and to maintain quality tubers under irrigated condition (Franzen, 2018). The isotope tracer technique indicates that plants utilize 29 to 77% of applied N fertilizer, and the difference method (i.e., the difference between fertilized and unfertilized) predicts 40 to 60% of fertilizer N recovery (Li et al., 2003; Roberts et al., 1991; Zebarth et al., 2004; Zvomuya et al., 2002). A significant portion of fertilizer‐N is subjected to loss through ammonia (NH3) volatilization, gaseous [nitrous oxide (N2O) and N2] emission, and nitrate (NO3−) leaching beyond the active root zone.Ammonia volatilization is most likely to occur in calcareous soils, soils with low buffering capacity, and soils with accumulation of crop residues on surface (Fenn and Hossner, 1985). Ammonia escaped from soil through volatilization can cause eutrophication and soil acidification (Zebarth and

Journal

"Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment"Wiley

Published: Jan 1, 2019

References