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Effects of socio‐economic status on infant native and non‐native phoneme discrimination

Effects of socio‐economic status on infant native and non‐native phoneme discrimination INTRODUCTIONDuring children's most formative years, many aspects of their growth and development are influenced by the socio‐economic status (SES) of their family (for a review, see Bradley & Corwyn, 2002). These early disparities in neurocognitive development have cascading effects on a range of long‐term developmental outcomes (Hair et al., 2015). Marked disparities are particularly evident in early language acquisition (e.g., Hart & Risley, 1995; Hoff, 2003; 2006; Kuchirko, 2019, but see Sperry et al., 2019). Thus far, effects of SES on language development have focused predominantly on vocabulary acquisition. In the present study, we investigated whether family SES predicts more primitive perceptual processes that precede the development of a vocabulary. Specifically, we examined whether infants’ abilities to detect phonetic contrasts are associated with variation in family SES.Several studies have revealed that effects of SES on language development originate in infancy and are rooted in the nature of child‐caregiver interaction. Although there is variation in the strength of SES effects across studies (e.g., Piot et al., 2022), in general, children from high‐SES families enjoy a more conversation‐rich environment (Fernald & Weisleder, 2015). Children in such environments profit from increased language input and develop larger and more diverse vocabularies (Rowe, 2008). They also build http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Science Wiley

Effects of socio‐economic status on infant native and non‐native phoneme discrimination

Developmental Science , Volume Early View – Nov 23, 2022

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
1363-755X
eISSN
1467-7687
DOI
10.1111/desc.13351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONDuring children's most formative years, many aspects of their growth and development are influenced by the socio‐economic status (SES) of their family (for a review, see Bradley & Corwyn, 2002). These early disparities in neurocognitive development have cascading effects on a range of long‐term developmental outcomes (Hair et al., 2015). Marked disparities are particularly evident in early language acquisition (e.g., Hart & Risley, 1995; Hoff, 2003; 2006; Kuchirko, 2019, but see Sperry et al., 2019). Thus far, effects of SES on language development have focused predominantly on vocabulary acquisition. In the present study, we investigated whether family SES predicts more primitive perceptual processes that precede the development of a vocabulary. Specifically, we examined whether infants’ abilities to detect phonetic contrasts are associated with variation in family SES.Several studies have revealed that effects of SES on language development originate in infancy and are rooted in the nature of child‐caregiver interaction. Although there is variation in the strength of SES effects across studies (e.g., Piot et al., 2022), in general, children from high‐SES families enjoy a more conversation‐rich environment (Fernald & Weisleder, 2015). Children in such environments profit from increased language input and develop larger and more diverse vocabularies (Rowe, 2008). They also build

Journal

Developmental ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 23, 2022

Keywords: infancy; socio‐economic status; speech perception

References