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Effect of Water Stress on the Yield of Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) Genotypes in the Delmarva Region of the United States

Effect of Water Stress on the Yield of Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) Genotypes in the... Drought is an important yield‐reducing factor for corn and soya bean which are the two major crops in the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia (Delmarva) region of the United States. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) is primarily grown in drier regions of the world where it is one of the most drought‐resistant food legumes. Field experiments were conducted in which 10 genetically diverse cowpea genotypes were evaluated for adaptability to the Delmarva area. The cowpea genotypes were grown in rain‐out shelters under non‐water‐stressed and water‐stressed conditions. The results showed that under non‐water‐stressed conditions cowpea genotypes California Blackeye 5, Champion and Mississippi Silver gave higher seed yields, while genotypes White Acre, Six Week Browneye and Texas Cream 8 provided lower seed yields. Genotypes California Blackeye 5 and Champion gave comparatively better seed yields under water‐stressed conditions. California Blackeye 5 was the highest seed‐yielding genotype under both water‐stressed and non‐water‐stressed conditions. The highest biological yield under non‐water‐stressed conditions was given by genotypes Two Crop Brown, White Acre and Elite, whereas under the water‐stressed condition genotypes Texas Cream 8, California Blackeye 5, and Mississippi Silver gave higher biological yield. Genotypes Quickpick Pinkeye and Elite were identified as early maturing genotypes. The harvest index (HI) varied significantly among genotypes, with Texas Cream 8 having the lowest HI. Cowpea genotypes which gave higher seed yield under water‐stressed conditions could play an important role in sustaining crop production in the Delmarva region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science Wiley

Effect of Water Stress on the Yield of Cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) Genotypes in the Delmarva Region of the United States

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0931-2250
eISSN
1439-037X
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-037X.2005.00155.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Drought is an important yield‐reducing factor for corn and soya bean which are the two major crops in the Delaware, Maryland and Virginia (Delmarva) region of the United States. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) is primarily grown in drier regions of the world where it is one of the most drought‐resistant food legumes. Field experiments were conducted in which 10 genetically diverse cowpea genotypes were evaluated for adaptability to the Delmarva area. The cowpea genotypes were grown in rain‐out shelters under non‐water‐stressed and water‐stressed conditions. The results showed that under non‐water‐stressed conditions cowpea genotypes California Blackeye 5, Champion and Mississippi Silver gave higher seed yields, while genotypes White Acre, Six Week Browneye and Texas Cream 8 provided lower seed yields. Genotypes California Blackeye 5 and Champion gave comparatively better seed yields under water‐stressed conditions. California Blackeye 5 was the highest seed‐yielding genotype under both water‐stressed and non‐water‐stressed conditions. The highest biological yield under non‐water‐stressed conditions was given by genotypes Two Crop Brown, White Acre and Elite, whereas under the water‐stressed condition genotypes Texas Cream 8, California Blackeye 5, and Mississippi Silver gave higher biological yield. Genotypes Quickpick Pinkeye and Elite were identified as early maturing genotypes. The harvest index (HI) varied significantly among genotypes, with Texas Cream 8 having the lowest HI. Cowpea genotypes which gave higher seed yield under water‐stressed conditions could play an important role in sustaining crop production in the Delmarva region.

Journal

Journal of Agronomy and Crop ScienceWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2005

References