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Editorial

Editorial European Journal of Cancer Care, 1998, 7, 1 and system for recognizing learning and awarding numerical points (credit points) as a means of quantifying time periods allocated to learning. In some States this previously voluntary activity by doctors undertaken for a personal professional updating has become mandatory, linked to the issue of registration and re-registration to practice medicine. Life-long learning is important for the professions with-in health care and particularly for those working in a fast moving speciality like oncology. The Federation of European Cancer Societies (FECS) has established a working party to look at continuing multiprofessional education in oncology in Europe. It has retained the term `CME' so that it is compatible with and understood by others throughout the world. This is chaired by James Geraghty, board member of EJCC. However, it is not just for doctors but for all those represented by the societies of FECS ± nurses, basic scientists, therapists, doctors, and so on. The European CME was first to seriously addressed in oncology in the early 1990s. This resulted in the European School of Oncology (ESO) and the EAC programme of the European Commission organizing a European consensus meeting in 1995, which was followed early in 1997 by another meeting which members of the Education and Training Committee of FECS were invited to attend. Consensus agreement was reached at this meeting for the need to develop a system for the overall development and management of CME in Europe. The working party are about to begin phase 3 of this five-phase project. It will not be a rapid development and there will be discussion and consultation all along the way. First, what seems clear is the enthusiasm for facilitating life-long learning for health professionals working in cancer and the acknowledgement that this may over time improve and somewhat standardize the care given to patients and positively influence outcomes for them. Second, there is clear enthusiasm for a multi- or inter-professional approach to learning. Cancer treatment and care is delivered by a multiprofessional team of health carers. It makes good sense that, where appropriate, education is enjoyed together rather than in the fragmented groups of just surgeons, just physicians, just doctors, just nurses or just therapists. This journal will update you on the results of the FECS working party as the project moves forward. I invite comment from readers on all things pertaining to education during 1998. Please write to the Editor with your views. # 1998 Blackwell Science Ltd. Ahed Bhed Ched Dhed Ref marker Fig marker Table marker Ref end Ref start http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Editorial

European Journal of Cancer Care , Volume 7 (1) – Mar 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2354.1998.00073.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

European Journal of Cancer Care, 1998, 7, 1 and system for recognizing learning and awarding numerical points (credit points) as a means of quantifying time periods allocated to learning. In some States this previously voluntary activity by doctors undertaken for a personal professional updating has become mandatory, linked to the issue of registration and re-registration to practice medicine. Life-long learning is important for the professions with-in health care and particularly for those working in a fast moving speciality like oncology. The Federation of European Cancer Societies (FECS) has established a working party to look at continuing multiprofessional education in oncology in Europe. It has retained the term `CME' so that it is compatible with and understood by others throughout the world. This is chaired by James Geraghty, board member of EJCC. However, it is not just for doctors but for all those represented by the societies of FECS ± nurses, basic scientists, therapists, doctors, and so on. The European CME was first to seriously addressed in oncology in the early 1990s. This resulted in the European School of Oncology (ESO) and the EAC programme of the European Commission organizing a European consensus meeting in 1995, which was followed early in 1997 by another meeting which members of the Education and Training Committee of FECS were invited to attend. Consensus agreement was reached at this meeting for the need to develop a system for the overall development and management of CME in Europe. The working party are about to begin phase 3 of this five-phase project. It will not be a rapid development and there will be discussion and consultation all along the way. First, what seems clear is the enthusiasm for facilitating life-long learning for health professionals working in cancer and the acknowledgement that this may over time improve and somewhat standardize the care given to patients and positively influence outcomes for them. Second, there is clear enthusiasm for a multi- or inter-professional approach to learning. Cancer treatment and care is delivered by a multiprofessional team of health carers. It makes good sense that, where appropriate, education is enjoyed together rather than in the fragmented groups of just surgeons, just physicians, just doctors, just nurses or just therapists. This journal will update you on the results of the FECS working party as the project moves forward. I invite comment from readers on all things pertaining to education during 1998. Please write to the Editor with your views. # 1998 Blackwell Science Ltd. Ahed Bhed Ched Dhed Ref marker Fig marker Table marker Ref end Ref start

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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