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Editorial

Editorial 6443 Radiographer 2/8/04 3:27 PM Page 3 rom its inception, the Australian Institute of Radiography has supported and nurtured the creation of a professional journal for the dissemination of information about the theory and practice of Fradiography and radiation therapy. However, since that time not only has the practice of radiog- raphy and radiation therapy irrevocably changed, the profession has achieved graduate status with an increasing number of its members gaining doctoral qualifications and in areas of direct relevance to practitioners. This is not to say The Radiographer has not attempted to keep up with the times. It is no longer a non-peer reviewed journal overseen by a dedicated member of the profession. An appropri- ately convened Editorial Review Board (ERB) now oversees the process of journal review and publi- cation recommendation. As a consequence of these developments, The Radiographer increasingly contains a range of original articles reflecting a broadening research interest within the profession. Yet despite these changes the question remains. How many others within health care around the world know about our achievements in research and professional and educational development? The Radiographer does not appear on citation data bases. In academic terms our journal actually does not exist. Our undergraduate and postgraduate students cannot find articles published in it when they do a literature search in the library. Well you might ask why does this matter? The ERB believes it matters if the profession is to actually survive in an increasingly multi-skilled health environment and grow both in terms of research and scope of practice. As befits a graduate profession the ERB is currently seeking the approval of Council to bring the transition period to a close and finally create an interna- tional peer reviewed and scholarly journal with a thematic approach to practice issues, research and sci- entific and technical advances and challenges. A key purpose of this editorial is to broaden the debate we need to have about the future of The Radiographer. The ERB believes firstly, there is a need to create a journal with a more inclusive title. In addition, given local demographics, there are valid reasons for reconceptualising the journal as a pro- fessional collaboration between all who practice under the umbrella of medical radiations science and between Australia and New Zealand and or the wider Pacific basin. Suggested titles for consideration include: • The Australian Journal of Medical Radiation Science, or • The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiation Science and Practice, or • The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiations, or • The Australasian Journal of Medical Radiation Science and Practice Secondly, we must have a clear statement of purpose for the publication.The unambiguous aim for a new look journal must be to act as a vehicle for the publication of quality medical radiations’ research and practice encompassing broad research traditions, clinical, technical and managerial papers and case studies. Thirdly, full details and qualifications of the members of the ERB must be published in the journal. As well there is an urgent need to broaden the composition of the ERB to include medical physicists, radiologists and oncologists. After all, the reputation of the journal ultimately rests upon the calibre of the ERB. Fourthly, the ERB has suggested the new look journal include the following sections: 1. Editorial (from the Editor i.e. Chair of the Editorial Review Board and not the President of Council) 2. Guest Editorials (from for example the President of Council) or Invited articles (where appropri- ate) 3. Original Articles/ Research (peer reviewed) 4. Research in Progress (peer reviewed) 5. Clinical Case Studies (peer reviewed) 6. Technical Papers (peer reviewed) 7. Management Issues/Papers (peer reviewed) 8. Student Projects/Issues (peer reviewed) 9. Book Reviews 10. Announcements I strongly believe the time has come for this profession to acknowledge its status as a graduate profes- sion and provide the means for all its members to be internationally recognised for their role in the delivery of evidence based health care and education. Changes to The Radiographer are necessary and timely. Associate Professor Marilyn Baird, PhD BA DCR The Radiographer – vol. 51, no. 2, August 2004 59 © 2004 Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy. Reproduced with permission by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy
eISSN
2051-3909
DOI
10.1002/j.2051-3909.2004.tb00001.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

6443 Radiographer 2/8/04 3:27 PM Page 3 rom its inception, the Australian Institute of Radiography has supported and nurtured the creation of a professional journal for the dissemination of information about the theory and practice of Fradiography and radiation therapy. However, since that time not only has the practice of radiog- raphy and radiation therapy irrevocably changed, the profession has achieved graduate status with an increasing number of its members gaining doctoral qualifications and in areas of direct relevance to practitioners. This is not to say The Radiographer has not attempted to keep up with the times. It is no longer a non-peer reviewed journal overseen by a dedicated member of the profession. An appropri- ately convened Editorial Review Board (ERB) now oversees the process of journal review and publi- cation recommendation. As a consequence of these developments, The Radiographer increasingly contains a range of original articles reflecting a broadening research interest within the profession. Yet despite these changes the question remains. How many others within health care around the world know about our achievements in research and professional and educational development? The Radiographer does not appear on citation data bases. In academic terms our journal actually does not exist. Our undergraduate and postgraduate students cannot find articles published in it when they do a literature search in the library. Well you might ask why does this matter? The ERB believes it matters if the profession is to actually survive in an increasingly multi-skilled health environment and grow both in terms of research and scope of practice. As befits a graduate profession the ERB is currently seeking the approval of Council to bring the transition period to a close and finally create an interna- tional peer reviewed and scholarly journal with a thematic approach to practice issues, research and sci- entific and technical advances and challenges. A key purpose of this editorial is to broaden the debate we need to have about the future of The Radiographer. The ERB believes firstly, there is a need to create a journal with a more inclusive title. In addition, given local demographics, there are valid reasons for reconceptualising the journal as a pro- fessional collaboration between all who practice under the umbrella of medical radiations science and between Australia and New Zealand and or the wider Pacific basin. Suggested titles for consideration include: • The Australian Journal of Medical Radiation Science, or • The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiation Science and Practice, or • The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medical Radiations, or • The Australasian Journal of Medical Radiation Science and Practice Secondly, we must have a clear statement of purpose for the publication.The unambiguous aim for a new look journal must be to act as a vehicle for the publication of quality medical radiations’ research and practice encompassing broad research traditions, clinical, technical and managerial papers and case studies. Thirdly, full details and qualifications of the members of the ERB must be published in the journal. As well there is an urgent need to broaden the composition of the ERB to include medical physicists, radiologists and oncologists. After all, the reputation of the journal ultimately rests upon the calibre of the ERB. Fourthly, the ERB has suggested the new look journal include the following sections: 1. Editorial (from the Editor i.e. Chair of the Editorial Review Board and not the President of Council) 2. Guest Editorials (from for example the President of Council) or Invited articles (where appropri- ate) 3. Original Articles/ Research (peer reviewed) 4. Research in Progress (peer reviewed) 5. Clinical Case Studies (peer reviewed) 6. Technical Papers (peer reviewed) 7. Management Issues/Papers (peer reviewed) 8. Student Projects/Issues (peer reviewed) 9. Book Reviews 10. Announcements I strongly believe the time has come for this profession to acknowledge its status as a graduate profes- sion and provide the means for all its members to be internationally recognised for their role in the delivery of evidence based health care and education. Changes to The Radiographer are necessary and timely. Associate Professor Marilyn Baird, PhD BA DCR The Radiographer – vol. 51, no. 2, August 2004 59 © 2004 Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy. Reproduced with permission by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd

Journal

Journal of Medical Radiation SciencesWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2004

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