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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction DOI: 10.1111/musa.12067 A short history of our Sonata Theory Symposium: The first paper was originally written by William Caplin for a conference on musical form sponsored by the Society for Music Analysis and held at the University of Durham in the summer of 2010; it was delivered there by Nathan Martin. Caplin then read his paper at the annual meeting of the Society for Music Theory in 2011. Martin had himself been looking at continuous expositions from the perspective of form-functional theory and presented his initial findings in a colloquium at the University of Oklahoma in 2011. Initially the two theorists were planning to publish their work independently, but in the wake of the SMT meeting they decided it would be more profitable to collaborate on a critique of the account of continuous expositions given in James Hepokoski and Warren Darcy’s Elements of Sonata Theory (Ch. 4). And so, when Hepokoski proposed to read his ‘Sonata Theory, Second Themes, and Continuous Exposition: Reply to William E. Caplin’ as one of the keynote papers at the Seventh International Conference on Music Theory (Tallinn, Estonia, 8–11 January 2014), it was logical for Caplin – also an invited keynote speaker at the conference – to offer his collaborative work with Martin, now significantly enlarged, as a complementary paper. It is this version presented at Tallinn that we publish here. However, Hepokoski’s response, which follows, represents a considerable expansion of the ‘Reply’ he read in Tallinn: in its present form it attempts to clarify aspects of Sonata Theory, in particular to explore further the relationship between one of its cardinal features – the ‘medial caesura’ – and the subordinate theme in sonata-form expositions. These two theoretical position papers are complemented by Benedict Taylor’s application of Sonata Theory to the mid-nineteenth-century piano concerto, a repertoire in which scholarly interest has grown considerably in recent years. In this Symposium the term ‘Sonata Theory’ – meaning sonata-form theory as expounded in the writings of Hepokoski and Darcy – is capitalised throughout. This is not intended to privilege their approach to Classical form, but rather to observe an orthographical convention in writings in the field. Support for Caplin and Martin’s research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Vlaanderen. The musical examples were prepared by Andrew Schartmann, who also provided helpful feedback on the ideas developed therein. The acknowledgements for Taylor’s study are given at the beginning of the notes to his article. Music Analysis, 35/i (2016) 3 © 2016 The Author. Music Analysis © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK and 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148, USA http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Editor's Introduction

Music Analysis , Volume 35 (1) – Mar 1, 2016

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DOI: 10.1111/musa.12067 A short history of our Sonata Theory Symposium: The first paper was originally written by William Caplin for a conference on musical form sponsored by the Society for Music Analysis and held at the University of Durham in the summer of 2010; it was delivered there by Nathan Martin. Caplin then read his paper at the annual meeting of the Society for Music Theory in 2011. Martin had himself been looking at continuous expositions from the perspective of form-functional theory and presented his initial findings in a colloquium at the University of Oklahoma in 2011. Initially the two theorists were planning to publish their work independently, but in the wake of the SMT meeting they decided it would be more profitable to collaborate on a critique of the account of continuous expositions given in James Hepokoski and Warren Darcy’s Elements of Sonata Theory (Ch. 4). And so, when Hepokoski proposed to read his ‘Sonata Theory, Second Themes, and Continuous Exposition: Reply to William E. Caplin’ as one of the keynote papers at the Seventh International Conference on Music Theory (Tallinn, Estonia, 8–11 January 2014), it was logical for Caplin – also an invited keynote speaker at the conference – to offer his collaborative work with Martin, now significantly enlarged, as a complementary paper. It is this version presented at Tallinn that we publish here. However, Hepokoski’s response, which follows, represents a considerable expansion of the ‘Reply’ he read in Tallinn: in its present form it attempts to clarify aspects of Sonata Theory, in particular to explore further the relationship between one of its cardinal features – the ‘medial caesura’ – and the subordinate theme in sonata-form expositions. These two theoretical position papers are complemented by Benedict Taylor’s application of Sonata Theory to the mid-nineteenth-century piano concerto, a repertoire in which scholarly interest has grown considerably in recent years. In this Symposium the term ‘Sonata Theory’ – meaning sonata-form theory as expounded in the writings of Hepokoski and Darcy – is capitalised throughout. This is not intended to privilege their approach to Classical form, but rather to observe an orthographical convention in writings in the field. Support for Caplin and Martin’s research was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Fonds Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Vlaanderen. The musical examples were prepared by Andrew Schartmann, who also provided helpful feedback on the ideas developed therein. The acknowledgements for Taylor’s study are given at the beginning of the notes to his article. Music Analysis, 35/i (2016) 3 © 2016 The Author. Music Analysis © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 9600 Garsington Road, Oxford OX4 2DQ, UK and 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148, USA

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2016

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