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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction In this issue of Music Analysis , we publish articles based on the papers read at the Schenker Documents session of the Fifth International Schenker Symposium, held in New York, 15–17 March 2013, and sponsored and organised by the Mannes College of Music. This represents a departure from the journal's usual offerings, in that we present research that is intended to cast light not so much on issues relating to the analysis of musical works, but rather on the events in a music theorist's life, on his achievements as a scholar, musician and thinker and, ultimately, on his character and personality. All of the authors were contributors to the project ‘Heinrich Schenker as Theorist, Teacher and Correspondent, 1925–1930’, which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of Great Britain and based at the University of Southampton between January 2011 and July 2014. This was but one of a series of phases of ongoing research known as the Schenker Correspondence Project when it was initiated by Ian Bent at Columbia University in 2004. The continuation of Bent's initiative as Schenker Documents Online has brought with it an enormous growth in the resources available to those interested in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Editor's Introduction

Music Analysis , Volume 34 (2) – Jul 1, 2015

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this issue of Music Analysis , we publish articles based on the papers read at the Schenker Documents session of the Fifth International Schenker Symposium, held in New York, 15–17 March 2013, and sponsored and organised by the Mannes College of Music. This represents a departure from the journal's usual offerings, in that we present research that is intended to cast light not so much on issues relating to the analysis of musical works, but rather on the events in a music theorist's life, on his achievements as a scholar, musician and thinker and, ultimately, on his character and personality. All of the authors were contributors to the project ‘Heinrich Schenker as Theorist, Teacher and Correspondent, 1925–1930’, which was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council of Great Britain and based at the University of Southampton between January 2011 and July 2014. This was but one of a series of phases of ongoing research known as the Schenker Correspondence Project when it was initiated by Ian Bent at Columbia University in 2004. The continuation of Bent's initiative as Schenker Documents Online has brought with it an enormous growth in the resources available to those interested in

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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