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Dvořák's Violin Concerto Reconsidered: Joachim's Influence, Bruch's Model and Romantic Innovations in Sonata Practice

Dvořák's Violin Concerto Reconsidered: Joachim's Influence, Bruch's Model and Romantic... Dvořák's Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53, maintains a curious position among the finest Romantic‐era compositions of the genre. Although it holds a secure place in the concert repertoire, it has achieved neither the exalted status of Beethoven's and Brahms's violin concertos, nor the popularity of those by Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky and Bruch. Scholars invariably cite the failure of the concerto's dedicatee, Joseph Joachim, to perform the work as evidence of his disapproval, and attribute that reputed disapproval to the first movement's truncated sonata form. These critics rely on Joachim's authority to shut the door precipitously, without detailed engagement with the concerto's technical attributes. The record of Joachim's participation in the concerto's creation calls into question this received wisdom and raises the possibility that Joachim may have encouraged Dvořák to pursue his unusual formal strategy. Short of that scenario, Joachim may not have discouraged the composer from following a path of inspiration originating in either his own imagination or the example of another violin concerto strongly influenced by Joachim's input – the Bruch G minor. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Music Analysis Wiley

Dvořák's Violin Concerto Reconsidered: Joachim's Influence, Bruch's Model and Romantic Innovations in Sonata Practice

Music Analysis , Volume 41 (1) – Mar 1, 2022

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Music Analysis © 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
0262-5245
eISSN
1468-2249
DOI
10.1111/musa.12181
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dvořák's Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53, maintains a curious position among the finest Romantic‐era compositions of the genre. Although it holds a secure place in the concert repertoire, it has achieved neither the exalted status of Beethoven's and Brahms's violin concertos, nor the popularity of those by Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky and Bruch. Scholars invariably cite the failure of the concerto's dedicatee, Joseph Joachim, to perform the work as evidence of his disapproval, and attribute that reputed disapproval to the first movement's truncated sonata form. These critics rely on Joachim's authority to shut the door precipitously, without detailed engagement with the concerto's technical attributes. The record of Joachim's participation in the concerto's creation calls into question this received wisdom and raises the possibility that Joachim may have encouraged Dvořák to pursue his unusual formal strategy. Short of that scenario, Joachim may not have discouraged the composer from following a path of inspiration originating in either his own imagination or the example of another violin concerto strongly influenced by Joachim's input – the Bruch G minor.

Journal

Music AnalysisWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2022

References