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Die Wurzelentwicklung von Zuckerrübenpflanzen auf einem Sandlöß‐Standort und ihre Bedeutung für die Stickstoffernährung

Die Wurzelentwicklung von Zuckerrübenpflanzen auf einem Sandlöß‐Standort und ihre Bedeutung für... Root development of sugar beet plants on a sandy loess site with regard to nitrogen nutrition. Root development of sugar beet plants in a sandy loess soil (Haplic Phaeozem) was observed from the early seedling stage up to harvest by measuring at first the greatest vertical and lateral extension of the root systems of single plants and later the rooting density of the whole plant stands (auger method, profile wall method). During the seedling stage not only the subsoil, but also large parts of the topsoil between the plants remained unoccupied by the root systems. In this phase the greatest lateral extension of single roots reaches nearly the length of the greatest leaf of the plant. With the closure of the canopy the rooting density in the topsoil accounts to 1–2 cm cm−3. In summer roots penetrate to a depth of 100–150 cm with rooting densities of 0.1 to 1 cm ‐ cm−3. Thus, the plants gain not only access to water reserves, but sometimes meet remarkable amounts of nitrate which under the relatively dry conditions of the region tends to accumulate in 60–120 cm depth and – when taken up by the beet plants in the late stage of growth – affects crop quality negatively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science Wiley

Die Wurzelentwicklung von Zuckerrübenpflanzen auf einem Sandlöß‐Standort und ihre Bedeutung für die Stickstoffernährung

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0931-2250
eISSN
1439-037X
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-037X.1992.tb01036.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Root development of sugar beet plants on a sandy loess site with regard to nitrogen nutrition. Root development of sugar beet plants in a sandy loess soil (Haplic Phaeozem) was observed from the early seedling stage up to harvest by measuring at first the greatest vertical and lateral extension of the root systems of single plants and later the rooting density of the whole plant stands (auger method, profile wall method). During the seedling stage not only the subsoil, but also large parts of the topsoil between the plants remained unoccupied by the root systems. In this phase the greatest lateral extension of single roots reaches nearly the length of the greatest leaf of the plant. With the closure of the canopy the rooting density in the topsoil accounts to 1–2 cm cm−3. In summer roots penetrate to a depth of 100–150 cm with rooting densities of 0.1 to 1 cm ‐ cm−3. Thus, the plants gain not only access to water reserves, but sometimes meet remarkable amounts of nitrate which under the relatively dry conditions of the region tends to accumulate in 60–120 cm depth and – when taken up by the beet plants in the late stage of growth – affects crop quality negatively.

Journal

Journal of Agronomy and Crop ScienceWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1992

References