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Development and psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the lung cancer screening health belief scale

Development and psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the lung cancer screening... INTRODUCTIONLung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, largely explained by the majority of lung cancer cases being diagnosed at an advanced stage contributing to the low survival rates (American Cancer Society, 2022). In what is considered a breakthrough in reducing lung cancer‐related mortality, the National Lung Screening Trial in the United States found that lung cancer screening with low‐dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest in individuals who have a long‐term smoking history has been shown to decrease relative lung cancer‐related mortality by approximately 20% (National Lung Screening Trial Research Team et al., 2011). In response to these findings, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued guidelines in 2013 recommending annual screening with an LDCT of the chest for individuals aged 55–80 years with a 30 pack‐year smoking history who either currently smoke or quit within the past 15 years (USPSTF, 2022a). In 2021, the USPSTF updated the eligibility criteria by decreasing the age of eligibility to 50 years and lowering the pack‐year history to 20 which subsequently increased the number of eligible individuals in the United States (USPSTF, 2022b) Despite the change in eligibility criteria and its intent to be more inclusive, lung cancer screening uptake remains abysmally low, particularly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Cancer Care Wiley

Development and psychometric evaluation of the Spanish version of the lung cancer screening health belief scale

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2022 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0961-5423
eISSN
1365-2354
DOI
10.1111/ecc.13707
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONLung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, largely explained by the majority of lung cancer cases being diagnosed at an advanced stage contributing to the low survival rates (American Cancer Society, 2022). In what is considered a breakthrough in reducing lung cancer‐related mortality, the National Lung Screening Trial in the United States found that lung cancer screening with low‐dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest in individuals who have a long‐term smoking history has been shown to decrease relative lung cancer‐related mortality by approximately 20% (National Lung Screening Trial Research Team et al., 2011). In response to these findings, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued guidelines in 2013 recommending annual screening with an LDCT of the chest for individuals aged 55–80 years with a 30 pack‐year smoking history who either currently smoke or quit within the past 15 years (USPSTF, 2022a). In 2021, the USPSTF updated the eligibility criteria by decreasing the age of eligibility to 50 years and lowering the pack‐year history to 20 which subsequently increased the number of eligible individuals in the United States (USPSTF, 2022b) Despite the change in eligibility criteria and its intent to be more inclusive, lung cancer screening uptake remains abysmally low, particularly

Journal

European Journal of Cancer CareWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2022

Keywords: cancer screening; health belief model; lung; patient reported outcome measures; psychometrics; psycho‐oncology

References